Myrlie Evers-Williams and the Journey to Equality

8232Myrlie Evers-Williams became a prominent social justice activist after the murder of her husband, civil rights activist Medger Evers. For more than five decades, she has continued to carry on his legacy, never relenting in her determination to change the face of race relations in this country. To many, she has become a symbol of courage and perseverance.

She reflects here on the impact of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, and calls on today’s Americans to continue her quest to quash racism and bring equality for all.

Ruminating on her long journey, in a soft voice, Evers-Williams said to herself, “you are not through yet.” And with her voice getting stronger, she said to the audience, “And I say to all of you, you are not through either… as long as America has the challenge of prejudice and racism in this country that is supposed to be a place free for all of us, to do and be the best that we can do, we have a challenge.”

This heartfelt talk was presented by Thurgood Marshall College, the Helen Edison Lecture Series and the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UC San Diego.

Watch Tomorrow’s Leaders: Building on the Legacy of Selma with Myrlie Evers-Williams.

Browse more programs from the Helen Edison Lecture Series.

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