Category Archives: UCLA

The Real History of Cinco de Mayo

Before you crack open that Corona or dip that tortilla chip in some tasty guacamole, maybe it’s time you understood what Cinco de Mayo is really all about.

Why is it that a holiday commemorating an 1862 Mexican victory over the French at Puebla is so widely celebrated in California and across the United States, when it’s scarcely observed in Mexico?

In this episode of UCLA’s SubtextDavid E. Hayes-Bautista, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA, sheds some light on the origins of this annual celebration, revealing that the holiday is not Mexican at all, but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the mid-nineteenth century.

The truth may not change your May 5th party plans, but at least you’ll know what you’re celebrating!

Watch “The History of Cinco de Mayo,” online now.

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Hang-in and Have Smart Friends: The Road to HIV Resistance

With this week’s incredible news that doctors have cured an infant of HIV for the first time, optimism about the scientific community’s decades-long efforts to defeat HIV and AIDS has surged.

Roger Detels, UCLA Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases, has been on the front lines since 1981, when he started a study of AIDS in young homosexual men in Los Angeles. In 1983, he formed a collaborative study with centers at three other institutions: Pittsburgh, Northwestern and Johns Hopkins. This study, known as the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS), is still going strong some 30 years later.

In his UCLA Faculty Research Lecture “Hang-in and Have Smart Friends: The Road to HIV Resistance,” Professor Detels shares the work of MACS and the process of studying — and preventing — HIV infections.

Check out more fascinating public talks from distinguished UCLA professors in a wide variety of fields at the UCLA Faculty Research Lecture series page.

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Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life

Someone in America is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every 68 seconds. Is there a way to keep this disease at bay?

Dr. Gary Small, a professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, suggests there may be.

In “Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life,” Dr. Small examines the connection between lifestyle choices and susceptibility and offers physical and mental preventative strategies, including stress relief and cross-training your brain.

Get a jump on your brain betterment by watching it now online.

Also make sure to watch UCTV Prime’s original web series, “Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” featuring Dr. Small and his UCLA colleagues who’ve made some promising strides in their Alzheimer’s research.

Want more healthy aging help? Check out the other programs from UC San Diego’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging at our website.

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32 Cluttered Families… Mine, too!

By Shannon Bradley, UCTV Producer

As the UCTV Prime producer behind “A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance,” I was drawn to this project because I am that demographic – I’m a middle-class, married mom who juggles work and family and who often feels overwhelmed by the stuff that fills our Southern California home.  I was curious about what the anthropologists (or ethnoarchaeologists, as they call themselves) would say about our lives.

I opened the book (on which this series is based), with a sense of fascination and dread.

photo[4]

I felt like a voyeur at first, seeing these vivid, intimate photographs of the insides of people’s homes. I couldn’t help but compare their bedrooms, bathrooms, kitchens and garages to my own.  And,like a New Year’s resolution, I was inspired to de-clutter the parts of my house that I control.

I started with my sons’ bedrooms.  After nearly drowning in toys, trucks, and yes, Beanie Babies, they now each have rooms that reflect who they are today –

Boy's room

a baseball shrine for one and a soccer/Lego/surf museum for the other.  Their old stuff is long gone to AmVets.

But then, I stopped.  I did light cleans in the kitchen and living areas, but there was no way I could make a dent in my husband’s office or the garage, which are the messiest spaces.

garage

OfficeInstead, I took what I learned from the book about the causes of clutter and chose to apply those lessons forward for the rest of the house.  I’m more careful now about adding to our possessions, by limiting bulk purchases and taking inventory before I shop, but I also understand that as long as I share my household with others, I will be surrounded by their stuff. And, like Lyn Repath-Martos (Family 27),  I’ve made peace with that.


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Is Your Kitchen a “Command Center?”

Think about your home for a second. What room gets the most traffic? Where do your kids do their homework? What does all of that stuff on the refrigerator door say about your family?

For middle-class American families, real estate inside the home can be as precious as the land underneath.  In “Space,” the final installment of UCTV Prime’s series “A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance,” UCLA anthropologists track how 32 families organize and prioritize their living space, with kitchens as command centers, bathrooms as bottlenecks, and master suites, in some cases, remodeled into hotel-like sanctuaries.

Don’t miss “Space — A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance (Ep. 3)” and, if you haven’t already, catch up with “Stuff (Ep. 1)” and “Food (Ep. 2”). You just might view your home — and maybe your family — a whole lot differently.

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