Tag Archives: aging

Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Older Adults

In the U.S., approximately 60% of men and 50% of women experience trauma at least once, and 7 – 8% of that population will develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to the National Center for PTSD..

In “Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Older Adults,” sponsored by the Stein Institute for the Research on Aging, Dr. Steven Thorp discusses the effects of PTSD, current treatment methods, and what the future might hold for PTSD patients.

Check out the other shows about Aging and Senior Health.

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Dementia in Society

Dementia is a deterioration of cognitive function that begins with mild cognitive impairment, which appears just like forgetfulness, and eventually ends in death.

There are many causes of the disease such as stroke, chronic alcohol abuse and Alzheimer’s but there is no way to reverse the damage of the brain’s degeneration.

Dr. Mario D. Garrett of San Diego State University’s School of Social Work discusses the social impacts of dementia, such as the way dementia is classified by institutions and even the errors he has found in the way dementia is perceived.

Watch “Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment – Research on Aging“ from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging to hear Garrett explain the revolution in dementia studies and the necessity for dementia victims to have social interaction.

Watch this other video on Dementia with Dr. Berneet Kaur.

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Say that again? Hope for Age Related Hearing Loss

One in ten Americans is affected by hearing loss significant enough to make them seek treatment.

Dr. Allen Ryan, professor of surgery and professor of neurosciences at UC San Diego’s School of Medicine, presents “New Methods for the Treatment of Hearing and Balance Disorders,” in which he reveals his research for potential treatments of hearing loss.

Watch as Ryan explains the inner workings of the ear, what exactly goes wrong to cause hearing loss, and his work with mice that might lead to a cure.

If you liked this video on aging, Click here for more videos from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging.

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Maximize your Memory with Brain Games

Do you have trouble remembering people’s names? Have you ever forgotten where you parked your car?

Dr. Kate Possin, assistant professor of neuropsychology at UCSF, says that those are actually specific memory problems that are linked with different circuits or memory systems in the brain. In this video, watch her use different memory tests to reveal the difference between types of memory, like long term memory and working memory.

If you answered yes to those first two questions, be sure to check out the brain games that can help you maximize the use of your memory.

Then, Dr.Winston Chiong, Neurology fellow at UCSF, discusses the link between the perception of oneself and memory, how neuroscience could help answer the existential question “what is the self?”

For more information from top neurology experts, see the other videos in the Multidimensional Mind series.

 

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Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection

Eating right takes on a whole new meaning when you watch “Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection” this month on UCTV.

In her helpful talk from UC San Diego’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging, Vicky Newman, MS, RD, explains how the right balance of foods, part of an anti-inflammatory eating plan, can maximize your health and energy level.  Learn practical tips for controlling your weight, maintaining bone strength and reducing the risk of common chronic diseases associated with aging. You’ll also find out about foods that support the body’s immune and detoxification systems, how to maintain a healthy (and happy) gut, and how to balance your fats to support your health and well-being.

Watch “Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection,” online now. For more valuable healthy aging tips and research updates, check out the Stein Institute’s video archive.

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