Tag Archives: global warming predictions

LA’s Climate Future

When we hear about polar ice caps melting, it sounds dangerous but also distant. The damage to our planet’s ecosystem caused by increasing levels of carbon dioxide is real, but we don’t see it.

It’s hard for people to take climate change seriously because it’s not immediately and directly affecting our lives, YET.

In order to give people a taste of what might happen when the consequences of global warming hit home, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability presents an in depth analysis of what LA’s climate could look like, if global warming continues in the direction it is going.

With sea levels rising, and temperatures increasing as well, what will the 3.82 million residents of Los Angeles have to look forward to?

Find out in “LA’s Climate Future: What’s Coming and What Choices We Face” as UCLA professor Alex Hall presents his high resolution predictions of what happens when the effects of climate change hit LA.

Check out other videos from UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability!

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How Hot Will It Get?

As this scorching summer winds down, take some time to reflect on the extreme heat of these past few summers, with 2010 and 2012 contending to be the first and third the hottest summers on record in the U.S., respectively.

It’s hard to argue against global warming in the midst of a heatwave, but how directly does this extreme weather correlate to our carbon consumption? And what does a rapidly warming planet mean for our future?

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Science at the Theater series includes presentations from climate scientists Bill Collins, Margaret Torn, Michael Wehner, and Jeff Chambers and UC Berkeley economist, Max Aufhammer, who discuss the pace and consequences of climate change.

Learn about the latest global warming projections from the experts in “How Hot Will It Get?.”

See what other cutting edge science videos are available in the Science at the Theater Series!

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