Tag Archives: media

What Does Vigilance Mean After Newspapers?

What does the death of newspapers mean for holding powerful institutions accountable? Who’s going to carry the torch?

The first program in the wide-ranging and fascinating “Searching for Democracy” series from Cal Humanities tackles these tough and important questions. Join Voice of San Diego CEO Scott Lewis, documentary filmmaker Bernardo Ruiz, and investigative journalist Carrie Lozano for a thought-provoking discussion about who will become the guardian of democracy in this fluctuating technological age.

Watch “What Does Vigilance Mean After Newspapers?” online now. And stay tuned throughout the month for more in the “Searching for Democracy” series featuring esteemed scholars, public intellectuals, policy specialists, journalists, and authors for conversation and dialogue on the evolution of civic conversation and the changing nature of democracy over time.

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Lloyd Braun: More Than Just a ‘Seinfeld’ Character

He was the inspiration for the character of George Costanza’s childhood friend Lloyd Braun on “Seinfeld,” but there’s a lot more to the real-life Lloyd Braun than a punchline.

The UC Hastings Law School alum began his career as an entertainment lawyer, but eventually moved over to the creative side of the business. Since then he’s had a hand in developing some of the biggest hit shows in television history, including “Lost,” “Desperate Housewives,” “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Boston Legal,” and “The Sopranos.”  In 2007, after a stint as head of Yahoo’s media group, Braun co-founded BermanBraun, an independent media company.

In the latest installment of “Legally Speaking,” from UC Hastings and California Lawyer, Braun speaks with Hastings Law School Dean Frank Wu about his career and the profound changes that are now rocking the entertainment industry.

Watch “A Conversation with Lloyd Braun,” online now.

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Listen to the Sounds of Capitalism….

Timothy Taylor’s “Sounds of Capitalism” might not espouse the same sentiments as Simon and Garfunkel’s “Sounds of Silence,” but they’re interesting nonetheless.

In his new book, Taylor,  a professor of ethnomusicology and musicology at UCLA, tracks the use of music in American advertising for nearly a century, from variety shows to the rise of the jingle, the postwar rise in consumerism and the more complete fusion of popular music and consumption in the 1980s and after. It’s fascinating stuff, especially as we find ourselves in such a turbulent and exciting time of media shape-shifting.

On the latest episode of “UCTV Prime Cuts,” Professor Taylor discusses the awkward transition endured by early 20th century advertisers as they adjusted to the new medium of radio.  For more from Taylor,  watch the entire interview here.

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