Tag Archives: uc berkeley

Lunch Poems: Student Reading

In keeping with its history of showcasing the current landscape of poetry, Lunch Poems showcases the work of UC Berkeley’s students.

Poets taking the podium include winners of the following prizes: Academy of American Poets, Cook, Rosenberg, and Yang. Several students were also nominated to read by UC Berkeley creative writing faculty, Lunch Poems volunteers, and student publications’ representatives.

Watch “Lunch Poems: Student Readings” and it might just inspire you to write some poetry of your own!

See what other poetry programs are available on UCTV or, check out the Writers Series.

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Force and Diplomacy with Karl Eikenberry

A commander of the army and a diplomat seem to be on opposite ends of the spectrum of foreign relations, but the two titles have been filled by one man: Karl Eikenberry.

In this episode of Conversations with History, Harry Kreisler is joined by Karl Eikenberry, who commanded coalition troops in Afghanistan and served as US Ambassador there.

Eikenberry is now the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at Stanford University, where he continues to teach that the two roles have more in common than one might think.

He encourages people in the armed forces, particularly army and marines (those deployed on the ground) to have a strong liberal arts background in order to better understand and empathize the foreign cultures that they work within.

Watch “Force and Diplomacy with Karl Eikenberry” to hear Eikenberry give his expert opinion on the current situation in Afghanistan as the U.S. formulates an exit strategy, turning its attention towards China.

See who else has visited UC Berkeley to join Harry Kreisler on Conversations with History.

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Story Hour in the Library with David Shields

David Shields graduated magna cum laude with Honors in English Literature from Brown University and earned his MFA in Fiction from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop. He published his first novel, Heroes, in 1984 and his second, Dead Languages, in 1989.

Shields is best known for his blending of genres, which began with his third book, Handbook for Drowning: A Novel in Stories. His stories such as Remote: Reflections on Life in the Shadow of Celebrity and Enough About You: Notes Toward the New Autobiography blur the lines of fiction, autobiography, and essay as Shields writes in a style that is suggested to represent the fragmented culture of this modern age.

Join Shields for Story Hour in the UC Berkeley library:

Watch and listen as other authors read their stories aloud in the Story Hour in the Library series.

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Revisiting the Rhetoric of the 2012 Presidential Debates

In the 2012 presidential campaign, both candidates repeatedly promised one thing: to deal with the economic and unemployment issues that plague the nation. Many voters were skeptical that the opposing candidate’s plan could really help Americans find work, which led to very heated debates on the matter.

Take a look inside the rhetoric of the 2012 campaign as UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy’s Dean, Henry E. Brady, joins UC Davis economist Hilary Hoynes and UC Berkeley sociologist Cybelle Fox to explore the way the candidates discussed income inequality.

Richard “Dick” Beahrs, a member of the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement Advisory Board at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, moderates the panel as they evaluate the way the debate strategies that each candidate used have affected bipartisanship, civility, and public discussion.

Watch “Makers v. Takers: A Sensible Way to Debate the Role of Government?” to see what you can determine about the two politicians’ use of words.

See what other videos are available from Goldman School of Public Policy.

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The Multidimensional Mind

In April, President Obama called for the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative, a research effort aimed at revealing some of the mysteries of the human brain.

The inner functioning of the brain is something we are only just beginning to understand and with each new revelation comes the immense complexity of the brain’s sophistication.

The Multidimensional Mind series, from UCSF Osher Mini Medical School, is a compilation of videos presenting the cutting edge developments in brain science and discoveries.

In Genes and the Brain: From Worms to People”, see how Dr. Aimee Kao, Dr. Dena Dubal and Jennifer Yokoyama study the way genes affect the brain through simple worms.

In Communicating Brains: From Autism and Dyslexia to Progressive Aphasia, Elysa Marco, Nina Dronkers and Maya Henry study disorders, such as autism, dyslexia, and aphasia to better understand the processes a healthy brain uses to communicate. Each disorder affects the brain differently revealing a different way the brain processes can be disrupted, thus divulging more about those communicative functions.

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