Tag Archives: uc berkeley

How Hot Will It Get?

As this scorching summer winds down, take some time to reflect on the extreme heat of these past few summers, with 2010 and 2012 contending to be the first and third the hottest summers on record in the U.S., respectively.

It’s hard to argue against global warming in the midst of a heatwave, but how directly does this extreme weather correlate to our carbon consumption? And what does a rapidly warming planet mean for our future?

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Science at the Theater series includes presentations from climate scientists Bill Collins, Margaret Torn, Michael Wehner, and Jeff Chambers and UC Berkeley economist, Max Aufhammer, who discuss the pace and consequences of climate change.

Learn about the latest global warming projections from the experts in “How Hot Will It Get?.”

See what other cutting edge science videos are available in the Science at the Theater Series!

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Seven Big Ideas – Science at the Theater

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Seven Big Ideas – 8 new episodes from the popular Science at the Theater series.

The first episode, Seven Big Ideas, features seven Berkeley lab scientists who have eight minutes each to introduce their revolutionary projects to the audience.

Meet Blake Simmons, who has been working on a plan to replace a barrel of oil with plants and microbes. But not just one barrel of oil, he says, his idea is intended to replace all the barrels of oil that keep countries all over the world moving.

He explains that oil produces many products for our carbon economy, such as gasoline, diesel, polymers and more. In order to undo our reliance on oil we have to find substitutes for all of these different products that the oil produces.

Watch “Seven Big Ideas” to hear about his plan to make replacing oil affordable and sustainable, as well as other game changing ideas from Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, Bill Jagust, and more!

See what other episodes are in the Science at the Theater series!

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Lunch Poems: Student Reading

In keeping with its history of showcasing the current landscape of poetry, Lunch Poems showcases the work of UC Berkeley’s students.

Poets taking the podium include winners of the following prizes: Academy of American Poets, Cook, Rosenberg, and Yang. Several students were also nominated to read by UC Berkeley creative writing faculty, Lunch Poems volunteers, and student publications’ representatives.

Watch “Lunch Poems: Student Readings” and it might just inspire you to write some poetry of your own!

See what other poetry programs are available on UCTV or, check out the Writers Series.

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Force and Diplomacy with Karl Eikenberry

A commander of the army and a diplomat seem to be on opposite ends of the spectrum of foreign relations, but the two titles have been filled by one man: Karl Eikenberry.

In this episode of Conversations with History, Harry Kreisler is joined by Karl Eikenberry, who commanded coalition troops in Afghanistan and served as US Ambassador there.

Eikenberry is now the William J. Perry Fellow in International Security at Stanford University, where he continues to teach that the two roles have more in common than one might think.

He encourages people in the armed forces, particularly army and marines (those deployed on the ground) to have a strong liberal arts background in order to better understand and empathize the foreign cultures that they work within.

Watch “Force and Diplomacy with Karl Eikenberry” to hear Eikenberry give his expert opinion on the current situation in Afghanistan as the U.S. formulates an exit strategy, turning its attention towards China.

See who else has visited UC Berkeley to join Harry Kreisler on Conversations with History.

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Story Hour in the Library with David Shields

David Shields graduated magna cum laude with Honors in English Literature from Brown University and earned his MFA in Fiction from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop. He published his first novel, Heroes, in 1984 and his second, Dead Languages, in 1989.

Shields is best known for his blending of genres, which began with his third book, Handbook for Drowning: A Novel in Stories. His stories such as Remote: Reflections on Life in the Shadow of Celebrity and Enough About You: Notes Toward the New Autobiography blur the lines of fiction, autobiography, and essay as Shields writes in a style that is suggested to represent the fragmented culture of this modern age.

Join Shields for Story Hour in the UC Berkeley library:

Watch and listen as other authors read their stories aloud in the Story Hour in the Library series.

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