Tag Archives: uc berkeley

Story Hour in the Library with David Shields

David Shields graduated magna cum laude with Honors in English Literature from Brown University and earned his MFA in Fiction from the University of Iowa’s Writers Workshop. He published his first novel, Heroes, in 1984 and his second, Dead Languages, in 1989.

Shields is best known for his blending of genres, which began with his third book, Handbook for Drowning: A Novel in Stories. His stories such as Remote: Reflections on Life in the Shadow of Celebrity and Enough About You: Notes Toward the New Autobiography blur the lines of fiction, autobiography, and essay as Shields writes in a style that is suggested to represent the fragmented culture of this modern age.

Join Shields for Story Hour in the UC Berkeley library:

Watch and listen as other authors read their stories aloud in the Story Hour in the Library series.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Revisiting the Rhetoric of the 2012 Presidential Debates

In the 2012 presidential campaign, both candidates repeatedly promised one thing: to deal with the economic and unemployment issues that plague the nation. Many voters were skeptical that the opposing candidate’s plan could really help Americans find work, which led to very heated debates on the matter.

Take a look inside the rhetoric of the 2012 campaign as UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy’s Dean, Henry E. Brady, joins UC Davis economist Hilary Hoynes and UC Berkeley sociologist Cybelle Fox to explore the way the candidates discussed income inequality.

Richard “Dick” Beahrs, a member of the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement Advisory Board at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, moderates the panel as they evaluate the way the debate strategies that each candidate used have affected bipartisanship, civility, and public discussion.

Watch “Makers v. Takers: A Sensible Way to Debate the Role of Government?” to see what you can determine about the two politicians’ use of words.

See what other videos are available from Goldman School of Public Policy.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

The Multidimensional Mind

In April, President Obama called for the BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative, a research effort aimed at revealing some of the mysteries of the human brain.

The inner functioning of the brain is something we are only just beginning to understand and with each new revelation comes the immense complexity of the brain’s sophistication.

The Multidimensional Mind series, from UCSF Osher Mini Medical School, is a compilation of videos presenting the cutting edge developments in brain science and discoveries.

In Genes and the Brain: From Worms to People”, see how Dr. Aimee Kao, Dr. Dena Dubal and Jennifer Yokoyama study the way genes affect the brain through simple worms.

In Communicating Brains: From Autism and Dyslexia to Progressive Aphasia, Elysa Marco, Nina Dronkers and Maya Henry study disorders, such as autism, dyslexia, and aphasia to better understand the processes a healthy brain uses to communicate. Each disorder affects the brain differently revealing a different way the brain processes can be disrupted, thus divulging more about those communicative functions.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Considering Dogs

 Have you ever wondered what your dog was thinking? Professor Alexandra Horowitz of Columbia University offers new insight to understanding the way a dog’s mind works. Hear Horowitz discuss the societal roles dogs have developed now, and throughout history in her talk, “Considering Dogs,” from the UC Berkeley Graduate Council.

In this episode of “Conversations with History,” Horowitz discusses what led her to write her best-selling book, Inside of a Dog, in which she analyzes the cognition of dogs with consideration of their wolf ancestry, anatomy, cognitive skills, and the way dogs have adapted to life with humans.

Dogs and humans might be more connected than you might think. UC Davis, one of the most renowned veterinary schools in the country, has these clips to offer about Dog Blood Donors, Dogs Getting Cancer Care, and Police Dogs.

Did you know that dogs can also have obsessive compulsive disorder? Check out the Zoobiquity Series, in which clinicians and veterinarians discuss how the same diseases afflict more than just humans, comparing ways to diagnose and treat illnesses between species.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Lunch Poems: Cathy Park Hong

Cathy Park Hong is a Korean-American writer raised in Los Angeles, who is now an associate professor at Sarah Lawrence College.

Her first book, “Translating Mo’um” was published in 2002 and won a Pushcart Prize that same year. Her second book is called “Dance Dance Revolution” and with that Hong won the Barnard Women Poets Prize. Her third book of poems was published last year and is titled “Engine Empire.”

Hong’s poetry is known for using “code-switching,” which means using the combination of words from different languages, including slang, mixed together within a story or poem.

Listen to this episode of Lunch Poems, as Hong reads one of her poems aloud at UC Berkeley.

Click here for more videos on Poetry, or check out our series on Writers.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus