Tag Archives: ucsb

Script to Screen- Hard Candy

Hear about the process in which a movie script makes it to the big screen as this latest episode of Script to Screen analyzes Hard Candy.

Screenwriter Brian Nelson and producer Richard Hutton of Vulcan Productions visit UC Santa Barbara to examine their popular production from it’s very roots, discussing inspirations for the plot and how they utilized the space of just one house for almost the entire film.

Nelson talks about how Hard Candy has distinguished his career, saying that he is now frequently approached to work on movies about psycho killers, brilliant teenage girls, and containment, not unlike one of his other films, 30 days of Night.

Watch “Script to Screen – Hard Candy” to learn more about the unique details of the movie’s production.

See what other films have been dissected in the Script to Screen series!

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Script to Screen-Sleepless in Seattle

Script to Screen celebrates the 20th anniversary of “Sleepless in Seattle” with Jeff Arch, the screenwriter behind this classic romantic comedy.

Arch analyzes the elements of writing a love story and the process of getting such an unconventional plot onto the screen. Learn how the characters came to life and found their way into the hearts of moviegoers everywhere.

Watch “Script to Screen – Sleepless in Seattle.

Check out other episodes of UC Santa Barbara’s Script to Screen Series.

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The Tipping Point for Global Temperatures

Just how dangerous is global warming?

We have heard the links made between climate change and extreme weather events like super-storm Sandy, but at what point will we definitively see the dangers of global warming?

David Lea of UC Santa Barbara’s Department of Earth Science explores that question in “Can Global Warming Be Held to 2 Degrees Celsius above Pre-Industrial?

He proposes what can be done to freeze the the rising temperatures of the earth to only slightly warmer than pre-industrial temperatures.

Watch as Lea discusses the societal impacts of certain temperature thresholds in different climate systems that we have yet to cross. Can this be prevented? Find out in this video from the Institute for Energy Efficiency:

For more videos on climate change, check out “The Scientific Case for Urgent Action to Limit Climate Change” and “Interactive Visioning-Figuring Sea Level Rise

 

 

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Stereotype Threat Up Close: See It, Fix It

Stereotype threat is the experience of anxiety in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about his or her social group. In school, stereotype threat can cause underrepresented students to perform below their potential. It can cause them to focus less on learning and more on the worrisome prospect of performing poorly.

The sting of stereotype threat can be felt by anyone: male or female, black or white, Asian or Latino, young or old. But when the threat is chronic, it can contribute to enduring patterns of inequality in school and beyond.

What can be done to reverse the effects of stereotype threat?

Claude Steele, social psychologist and dean for the School of Education at Stanford University, illuminates the experience of stereotype threat and highlights the powerful ways we can diminish it and close the achievement gap between groups.

Watch “Stereotype Threat Up Close: See It, Fix It,” presented by the Sage Center for the Study of the Mind at UC Santa Barbara.

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A Movie’s Journey from Script to Screen

There are films that are undeniable works of art. Others are just plain awful. And then there are those movies that, when you stumble across them on cable for the hundredth time, demand to be watched yet again.

What makes a movie so undeniably watchable? If Hollywood had the answer, epic bombs would be a thing of the past. But one way to get at least a little bit closer to this elusive secret is to learn from those who’ve managed to do it themselves. That’s what the “Script to Screen” series from UC Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center, now available online, offers as it brings together creative talent to share their stories behind some modern classics.

Script to Screen: Back to the Future
Screenwriter and producer Bob Gale joins Christopher Lloyd, who played Dr. Emmett Brown, to share rare insights into the ” Back to the Future” series.

Script to Screen: Dead Poets Society
“Dead Poets Society” won the Academy Award for Best Screenplay in 1989 and tells the story of an English teacher (Robin Williams) who uses poetry to inspire his students to seize the day and follow their own life path. Screenwriter Tom Schulman talks about writing the script, and inspires all of the screenwriters in the audience to pursue their own dreams.

10-thingsScript to Screen: 10 Things I Hate About You
Screenwriting duo Kirsten Smith and Karen McCullah Lutz bring down the house with their hilarious inside Hollywood stories. In addition to “10 Things I Hate About You,” their other films include “Legally Blonde,” “She’s the Man,” “The House Bunny,” “The Ugly Truth,” and “Ella Enchanted.”

If you’re craving more tales from the heart of Hollywood, check out the rest of the Carsey-Wolf series, named for legendary TV producers Marcy Carsey (“The Cosby Show,” “Roseanne”) and Dick Wolf (“Law & Order), featuring an impressive roster of talent making some of the most popular entertainment today.

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