Category Archives: Cancer and Oncology

Prostate Cancer

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men in the United States. The good news is that it is treatable in the early stages. This series of experts in the field is designed for patients, families, caregivers, health care providers and all those interested in information and tools to make informed decisions about treatment.

This event was presented by the California Prostate Cancer Coalition and the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

Topics include:

• Prostate Cancer Basics
• Genetics and Genomics
• Immunology
• Clinical Trials
• ABCs of Androgen Deprivation Therapy
• Low-Risk Disease and Active Surveillance
• Treatment of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Disease
• Systemic Therapy
• Imaging
• Diet and Exercise
• Managing Side Effects
• Access to Care
• Intimacy and Sexual Function

Browse more programs in Prostate Cancer Patient Conference.

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All About the Brain

Explore the immensity of the human brain, its billions of neurons and trillions of connections, and the research that is helping us understand more about this complex and amazing organ.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s popular lecture series returns with four new episodes each relating to the brain. The lectures are aimed at a middle and high school level and presented by LLNL scientists in collaboration with high school science teachers. This is a great opportunity to get a look at the cutting-edge science in a friendly and understandable way. Explore the immensity of the human brain, its billions of neurons and trillions of connections, and the research that is helping understand more about this amazing organ.

Browse more programs in Field Trip at the Lab: Science on Saturday.

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When Should You Seek Medical Care?

Knowing when to seek medical care can save your life but how can you tell if your complaint is best ignored or worth a trip to the doctor? Googling your symptoms can amplify concerns rather than ameliorate them but often common complaints are not a cause for worry.

This series features leaders in their field who address six common medical complaints, including blood pressure, palpitations, snoring, trouble urinating, skin lesions, and neck lumps.

Learn the signs that should raise concern and when it’s ok to relax, kick back, and focus on everyone else’s problems!

Browse more programs in Common Medical Complaints: When Should I Worry?

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Cancer from an Evolutionary Perspective

Humans have a relatively high risk of developing cancer in their lifetimes. But cancer is not unique to humans. Across the tree of life, we can trace cancer vulnerabilities back to the origins of multicellularity. Cancer is observed in almost all multicellular phyla, including lineages leading to plants, fungi, and animals.

However, species vary remarkably in their susceptibility to cancer. And some organisms are much better at killing problem cells. Amy Boddy discusses how this variation is characterized by life history trade-offs, especially longevity. Interestingly, different species have evolved different ways to fight cell mutations that cause cancer. This may lead to a better understanding of cancer susceptibility across human populations.

Amy Boddy is an Assistant Professor in the Integrated Anthropological Sciences Unit and a Research Associate in the Broom Center for Demography at UC Santa Barbara. Boddy completed her PhD in molecular biology and genetics at the Wayne State University – School of Medicine in 2013. Her work uses applications from evolution and ecology to understand human health and disease. She uses a combination of genomics, computational biology and evolutionary theory to understand life history trade-offs between survival and reproduction across different levels of biological organization. One component of her research program examines how environmental cues, such as high extrinsic mortality, may guide resource allocations to cancer defenses and reproduction. Current cancer research topics include comparative oncology, intragenomic conflict, cellular life history trade-offs, and early life adversity and cancer outcomes later in life. In addition to her cancer research, she studies maternal/fetal conflict theory and the consequences of fetal microchimeric cells in maternal health and disease.

Watch Cancer Across the Tree of Life: New Insights into an Ancient Disease

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