Tag Archives: medicine

It’s National Immunization Awareness Month

Are you up to date on all your vaccines?

Shots are extremely important for infants in order to ensure the prevention of illness when their newborn immune systems are so vulnerable.  Hear from Dr. Lisa Stellwagen, clinical professor of pediatrics and medical director of Newborn Services at UC San Diego, in this episode of Health Matters to learn about what vaccines a newborn needs.

It’s also important for children to be up to date on vaccines before starting school, as children with vaccine-preventable illnesses can be denied attendance. The Vaccines for Children program has been federally funded to provide free vaccines to children of low-income families. Learn about recommended and mandatory vaccines for children in “Safety of Childhood Vaccines.”

Remember that shots are not just for kids. People of all ages need to keep track of their immunization record to be sure that they are protecting themselves from deadly diseases. Dr. Lisa Winston of UCSF’s Division of Infectious Diseases explains the need for different vaccines at different stages of life in “Vaccines for Adults and Adolescents.”

If you are planning to go on an exotic vacation, watch “Travel Medicine-Health Matters” as you might need to get extra vaccines before you expose yourself to unfamiliar pathogens.

Check out other programs with information on immunization on UCSD-TV.

Learn more about National Immunization Awareness Month at the Center for Disease Control.

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Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Older Adults

In the U.S., approximately 60% of men and 50% of women experience trauma at least once, and 7 – 8% of that population will develop Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), according to the National Center for PTSD..

In “Posttraumatic Stress and Growth in Older Adults,” sponsored by the Stein Institute for the Research on Aging, Dr. Steven Thorp discusses the effects of PTSD, current treatment methods, and what the future might hold for PTSD patients.

Check out the other shows about Aging and Senior Health.

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UCLA’s School of Nursing Combats TB on Skid Row

UCLA’s School of Nursing has partnered with the Union Rescue Mission to provide tuberculosis testing for those on Skid Row. The UCLA Newsroom gives us an inside look at the clinic within the Union Rescue Mission and the work they are doing to combat a recent outbreak of TB in the area.

“The first shoot we had scheduled was in Gladys Park a few blocks away from the clinic. They do an outreach when the park opens up and they offer testing,” said Sebastian Hernandez, Manager of the Broadcast Studio, who was involved in the filming of this documentary.

UCLA Today reports, “Public health officials have identified 78 TB cases that have occurred on skid row in 2007-2012. Of those cases, 60 people were homeless. And of those 60, 11 died of TB. All of these cases could have been treated with medication, the county reported.”

The School of Nursing offers testing to all who are willing, whether or not they are staying at the mission.

“It’s a different reality down there [in Gladys Park]. It’s a shady part of town, but you recognize that they are just people trying to cope. It was different inside the mission. People are more at ease. It feels like a safer place for the people living there.”

Hernandez says that the rescue mission seems like it can be a launching pad to get people off the streets and presents them with many different health care services.

“It’s valuable to recognize that there are a bunch of different steps involved in addressing homelessness and all the issues surrounding it. They seem to do a good job of giving the residents the comprehensive care that they need,” says Hernandez. “We need to be aware that a process is necessary and no ‘one free lunch program’ is going to solve the issue. People can mention how homelessness is sad but I hope that seeing this can inspire people to really get beyond guilt and actively support broad policies that address homelessness.”

Watch “UCLA Faces TB Outbreak on Skid Row in LA” to get a glimpse of what life is like inside the Union Rescue Mission.

See what other programs on infectious diseases are available on UCTV Prime.

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Combating Cardiac Arrest

What kills more people than AIDS, breast cancer, and lung cancer combined? Cardiac arrest.

Cardiac arrest is the heart’s inability to contract properly which causes the blood to stop circulating. When this occurs, the brain doesn’t receive oxygen which can lead to death in a matter of minutes. Cardiac arrest kills an average of 1,000 people every day.

In this episode of Health Matters, Dr. David Granet and his guest, Dr. Ulrika Birgersdotter-Green, introduce the newest device called an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator that could help save lives.

Watch “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators and Sudden Cardiac Death” to discover how it works in conjunction with the heart’s electrical system and learn tips for lowering your risk of cardiac arrest.

Check out other programs about cardiology on UCSD-TV.

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HIV: Past, Present, and Future

Humans have faced many epidemics, from the historical bubonic plague to diseases such as Malaria and Measles that still kill people today. But, none are quite like the virus that runs rampant through modern society: Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV.

Dr. Jay Levyan, a professor and AIDS and cancer researcher at UCSF, was one of the doctors involved in the discovery of the disease in the early 1980’s. In “HIV: A Primer,” Dr. Levyan explains some of the basic science behind the disease and what he thinks makes it so different from other epidemics. He says that HIV can interact with and infect a variety of different cells. Our vaccines are formulated to combat the free virus in the body, where medicines to combat HIV need to focus on treating the infected cell.

Dr. C. Bradley Hare, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Medical Director, UCSF HIV/AIDS Division at San Francisco General Hospital gives a more personal look at HIV by examining individual cases of the disease in this most recent video of the HIV: Past, Present, and Future series, presented by UCSF Osher Mini Medical School.

Now that you’ve learned about the history of HIV, see what you know about the prevention of HIV and the future of the disease in this video, “HIV, Prevention and Global Health.”

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