Tag Archives: medicine

Dementia in Society

Dementia is a deterioration of cognitive function that begins with mild cognitive impairment, which appears just like forgetfulness, and eventually ends in death.

There are many causes of the disease such as stroke, chronic alcohol abuse and Alzheimer’s but there is no way to reverse the damage of the brain’s degeneration.

Dr. Mario D. Garrett of San Diego State University’s School of Social Work discusses the social impacts of dementia, such as the way dementia is classified by institutions and even the errors he has found in the way dementia is perceived.

Watch “Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment – Research on Aging“ from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging to hear Garrett explain the revolution in dementia studies and the necessity for dementia victims to have social interaction.

Watch this other video on Dementia with Dr. Berneet Kaur.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Fighting food Allergies in Children

Every three minutes some one goes to the emergency room because of an allergy-related event.

When you have an allergic reaction to something you eat, your body recognizes a protein in the food and reacts against it. There are many different responses that can happen-rashes, hives, diarrhea-but, the most dangerous occurrence is when there is potential for anaphylaxis, which can cause death.

In this episode of Health Matters, Dr. David Granet talks with UC San Diego’s Dr. Stephanie Leonard who is the director of the Food Allergy Center at Rady Children’s Hospital here in San Diego.

More than 3 million people under the age of 18 have been diagnosed with food allergies, but Dr. Leonard says that number is on the rise. In a ten year period, she says, there has been an 18% increase in the diagnosis of food allergies in children.

Watch “Children’s Food Allergies- Health Matters” to hear the various theories behind why that number is increasing.

For more information, check out these videos on Allergy and Immunology.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Boo-Boos and Bellyaches: New Approaches to Keeping Kids Healthy

Are children today sicker or healthier than we were?

Increasingly, things that were thought to be a normal part of childhood are being recognized and treated as chronic medical conditions. Where do we draw the line between these “normal things that kids get” and “medical conditions?”

In the face of a seemingly rapid increase in the number of children with acute and chronic illnesses, the new UCSF Mini Medical School series, “New Approaches to Keeping Kids Healthy,” explores what we know and what remains a mystery (or a simple myth) and challenges you to think in new ways about old concepts in pediatric medicine. 

The six-part series runs through the first week of November. You can find all program listings at the series page, with more coming online each week. Here’s what’s available now:

Food Allergies: Past, Present and Future

Is Fast Food Addictive?

The Science Behind Old Wives’ Tales: Fact vs. Fiction

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Alzheimer’s Patient and Caregiver Support

It’s often said, “If you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s, then you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s.” The disease affects everyone differently, but all patients and their families experience some form of grief and fear, not to mention the stress put on the caregivers.

In the third and final installment of UCTV Prime’s series “Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” UCLA researchers and clinicians offer up new models for healthcare and caregiver support that emphasize early diagnosis and support networks for everyone touched by the disease, including Patti Davis, daughter of Ronald Reagan, and TV personality Leeza Gibbons, who lost her mother to Alzheimer’s.

Watch “Alzheimer’s Patient and Caregiver Support – Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic (Ep. 3),” only on UCTV Prime.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic

As Baby Boomers become senior citizens, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are on track to reach epidemic proportions, with a new diagnosis every 68 seconds and an annual cost of $1.2 trillion projected by 2050, not to mention the psychological toll on family members caring for their loved ones.

Premiering September 18, UCTV Prime’s original series “Heartache and Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,”  reveals what it’s like for patients and families living with this devastating disease and how UCLA researchers are leading the charge to slow its progress and, eventually, find a cure.

With 50% of primary caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients at risk of severe clinical depression, UCLA is working with local organizations and community leaders to establish caregiver support groups and connect caregivers to community resource centers. “Heartache and Hope” profiles several, including one established by Patti Davis, daughter of President Ronald Reagan, and another by television personality Leeza Gibbons, who lost her mother to the disease. Both women are featured in the series.

Researchers at UCLA and beyond are moving fast to understand Alzheimer’s disease and develop effective treatments. “Heartache and Hope” includes interviews with top UCLA researchers and their patients involved in the latest clinical trials, some of which demonstrate promising results.

You won’t want to miss this powerful, three-part series premiering September 18 on UCTV Prime’s YouTube channel and website, with new episodes every Tuesday through October 2. In the meantime, watch the trailer and spread the word!

 

 

facebooktwittergoogle_plus