Category Archives: Education Issues

Middle School Students Explore the World of Work

8232What do you want to be when you grow up? That’s a really tough question, especially if you don’t know what the possibilities are.

Join a group of middle schools students at Qualcomm’s Thinkabit Lab as they start to think about their future in the world of work and begin to discover jobs best suited for them. Qualcomm has developed tools to teach students about the kinds of jobs that exist and how to find jobs that are meaningful and exciting. Even if you’re not a middle school or high school student, this approach to facing the world of work may benefit you as you think about your career future.

The team at Qualcomm’s World of Work room invites students to determine their strengths, list their interests, and prioritize their core values. Through a series of guided questions, students “stand up” for qualities they might enjoy in a career, and “sit down” for qualities they wouldn’t. Perhaps working long hours on holidays and weekends is a “sit down” for you. If so, knowing that early on could prevent a long road towards an ultimately unsatisfying career.

Outside the lab, students are encouraged to keep their eyes open and ask questions. When they see people enjoying their careers, ask them why. What makes a job meaningful for them? What qualities do they need to succeed in those careers? And just as important, ask people what they like least about their careers. What’s the worst part of their jobs and what would they change if they could?

Through self-evaluation and exploration of multiple possibilities, students begin to honestly explore careers that could last them a lifetime.

Watch Qualcomm Thinkabit Lab Presents: World of Work.

Browse more programs on The STEAM Channel.

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Women in Biotech

8232Tina Nova is the kind of person that makes you want to get up and shout, “Hey World, look out!”

As she recalls her journey from a small town in California’s Central Valley to launching multi-million dollar companies in San Diego, she inspires some 300 high school girls gathered at the Salk Institute for a pep talk on pursuing careers in biotech.

And it’s not just her!

Janelle Ayres of Salk and three other smart and successful women follow with stories of their own paths to satisfying lives based on their love for science.

Check out Women in Biotech, presented by the STEAM Leadership Series on The STEAM Channel.

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Innovation, Inspiration, and STEAM

8232“Science allows us to create solutions to human problems.” – Dr. Diego Miralles

Dr. Diego Miralles, Global Head of Innovation for Johnson & Johnson’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals, has always been enchanted by science. As someone who views success as having a positive impact on the world around you, he has spent much of his career turning scientific discoveries into tools for helping others. Listen in as he shares his personal and professional journey with a group of high school students in the first installment of The STEAM Leadership Series.

Watch Diego Miralles, MD: The STEAM Leadership Series on:

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Ed Abeyta on the Importance of STEAM Education

ed abeytaUCTV’s recently launched STEAM Channel is a platform for all things science, technology, engineering, arts and math. We sat down with the channel’s founding partner and director of K-16 Programs at UC San Diego Extension, Ed Abeyta, to learn more about the STEAM movement and how it impacts students, educators and parents.

UCTV: How did you get involved in the world of STEAM?

Ed Abeyta: STEAM became the framework for the creation of our K-16 division in 2010. It was inspired by Harvey White, co-founder of Qualcomm Inc., who believed the Arts (the creative skills) plus STEM are key for industry success. “STEM education is necessary but it is not sufficient – we must have STEAM education – our future is at risk otherwise.”

UCTV: Why STEAM and not STEM?

EA: STEM is based on skills generally using the left half of the brain and thus is logic driven. Much research and data shows that activities like Arts, which uses the right side of the brain supports and fosters creativity, which is essential to innovation. Clearly the combination of superior STEM education combined with Arts education (STEAM) should provide us with the education system that offers us the best chance for regaining the innovation leadership essential to the new economy.

UCTV: Why is STEAM so important for today’s students and teachers?

EA: There seems to be consensus that for the US to replace the lost jobs from the industrial sector we must create the new industries that will drive the future economies of the world – and that requires innovation. So we need to focus on examining some of the difference between what and how we “teach” today and what we need to change to effectively “teach” innovation. The underlying need is to refocus the system to teach innovation – not just facts.

UCTV: How is STEAM changing the way we think about education?

EA: STEAM is not about adding to the acronym, but instead adding to the relevancy of learning. As Vince Bertram, President and CEO, Project Lead The Way, Inc., noted “It’s about showing students how concepts relate to real-world situations and providing them with hands-on projects and problems that help them apply concepts in a new context. It’s about nurturing students’ curiosity and helping them develop creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills.”

UCTV: Why should universities help lead the charge for STEAM in K-12?

EA: The core disciplines are beginning to merge. Visual Arts, Computer Science, and Engineering are working more closely to utilize expertise in each of their domains to solve problems. This mindset showcases what awaits the next generation at post-secondary institutions like UC San Diego.

UCTV: How can parents involve their children in STEAM education?

EA: At its heart, STEAM is about solving real-world problems. The world is going to need more and more graduates with the skills to identify problems, visualize solutions, design prototypes and implement solutions. Parents should seek every learning opportunity that incorporates practice based learning and challenge their children to continually think out of the box.

UCTV: What can viewers expect from the STEAM Channel in the coming months?

EA: The STEAM Channel will begin showcasing how STEAM is connected to research, policy, education, and industry. We will also seek to provide programming resources to enable parents, mentors and teachers to utilize our programming as a teaching platform.

Visit The STEAM Channel today!

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Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason

Conversations with History welcomes UC Berkeley’s Professor Mary Ann Mason to discuss her career as a university official, historian, and lawyer, as well as the changing role of women in academia and society.

Mason says moving to Berkeley at the end of the 60’s raised her awareness of issues, particularly the women’s rights movement, which was just beginning to gain momentum.

She was teaching history at a small college in Oakland when she joined the women’s consciousness raising movement. They held a gathering of women teaching history at four year colleges and they realized what a small group they were. There were only eight of them, in all of California. As for the UCs at the time, Mason reports that there were only 1.3 women historians for each campus.

Throughout her time in Berkeley, Mason watched the equality of women improve. When she got hired as a professor by UC Berkeley in 1989, about 15 percent of the faculty were women, which she reports is a huge improvement from just 2 percent in 1972.

Hear how these cultural and structural changes came about in “Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason.”

Be sure to see what other programs are available in the Conversations with History series!

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