Category Archives: Election

What’s Next for NAFTA?

8232Will he or won’t he? After months of threatening to scrap the North American Free Trade Agreement, whispers from the White House now suggest that President Trump may be backing off this prominent campaign pledge. But we’re still hearing about GOP support for a Border Adjustment Tax and other proposals that would fundamentally alter the
trade, security and diplomatic relationships among the three partners, Mexico, Canada and the United States.

To get a sense of what’s at stake, the Center for US-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego convened an A-list group of experts, including the New York Times’ Elisabeth Malkin, the Wall Street Journal’s Dudley Althaus, former Homeland Security Asst. Secretary Alan Bersin, former US Ambassador to Mexico Jeffrey Davidow and other academic, government and business leaders for robust and informative discussions on the issues that shape, and challenge, this landmark trade agreement.

Watch What’s Ahead for NAFTA

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Revisiting the Rhetoric of the 2012 Presidential Debates

In the 2012 presidential campaign, both candidates repeatedly promised one thing: to deal with the economic and unemployment issues that plague the nation. Many voters were skeptical that the opposing candidate’s plan could really help Americans find work, which led to very heated debates on the matter.

Take a look inside the rhetoric of the 2012 campaign as UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy’s Dean, Henry E. Brady, joins UC Davis economist Hilary Hoynes and UC Berkeley sociologist Cybelle Fox to explore the way the candidates discussed income inequality.

Richard “Dick” Beahrs, a member of the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement Advisory Board at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, moderates the panel as they evaluate the way the debate strategies that each candidate used have affected bipartisanship, civility, and public discussion.

Watch “Makers v. Takers: A Sensible Way to Debate the Role of Government?” to see what you can determine about the two politicians’ use of words.

See what other videos are available from Goldman School of Public Policy.

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Presidential Predictions

The presidential election is over, but there is still a lot to be learned from the votes.

A panel of experts comprised by UC Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies analyzes President Obama’s re-election and what it can tell us about the President’s second term.

Was this election a demand for Obama’s return or was it merely a rejection of Republican candidate Mitt Romney? Obama won with a smaller majority then he did in his first election. Is this a reflection of the president’s leadership in his first term? Can we expect changes in his policy?

Find out the answers and more in “Four More Years: Obama’s Re-Election and the Prospects for a Second Term: 32nd Annual Review of the Presidency.”

Check out these videos about national issues and politics to learn more.

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Theda Skocpol: The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism

History happens on a regular basis on UCTV with the long-running interview series “Conversations with History,” hosted by Harry Kreisler of UC Berkeley’s Institute of International Studies, and with the election just more than a week away, we’re making history fast.

This week, Kreisler welcomes Harvard University’s Theda Skocpol for a discussion of America’s political future. After reflecting on her intellectual journey, Professor Skocpol talks about her timely new books, “Obama and America’s Political Future” and “The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism” (co-authored with Vanessa Williamson) and shares her strategy in studying political and social transformations, her analysis of the Tea Party and its long term impact on the Republican Party, and the reasons for President Obama’s failure to meet progressive expectations after the high hopes generated by his 2008 campaign.

Watch The Tea Party with Theda Skocpol – Conversations with History

 

 

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E.J. Dionne – Our Divided Political Heart

Fear of decline is one of the oldest American impulses. When we feel we are in decline, we sense that we have lost our balance.  We argue about what history teaches us—and usually disagree about what history actually says.  We conclude that behind every crisis related to economics and the global distribution of power lurks a crisis of the soul.

In E.J. Dionne’s talk, “Our Divided Political Heart: The Battle for the American Idea in an Age of Discontent,” from UC Santa Barbara’s Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion and Public LIfe, the Washington Post columnist argues that underlying our political impasse is a lost sense of national balance that, in turn, reflects a loss of historical memory.  Americans disagree about who we are because we can’t agree about who we’ve been.

Watch “E.J. Dionne, Jr. – Our Divided Political Heart: The Battle for the American Idea in an Age of Discontent.”

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