Category Archives: interviews

Inspiration and Expertise – Conversations with UCSF Authors

8232What makes a world-class physician or scientist decide to write a book for the wide world of readers? Where do they find the inspiration and the time? What do they hope to accomplish? How do the satisfactions of writing compare to practicing medicine or writing scholarly articles?

Six recently published UCSF authors tackle these questions and more in these fascinating interviews:

Life After the Diagnosis: Expert Advice on Living Well with Serious Illness for Patients and Caregivers

Patients and caregivers living well with serious illness

Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives and Where to Draw the Line
The potential overuse of medical care and when to say “enough”

The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age
The impact of technology and the digital revolution on health and health care

Sensing Light
The impact of AIDS in San Francisco through the eyes of three fictional doctors

Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon
The consequences of hazardous manufacturing and poisonous materials on public health

Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America
The role of the pharmaceutical industry in creating a new disease, short stature, to sell new a medication.

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Willan’s Recipes

25903Anne Willan has quietly made a significant international contribution as both a teacher and a cookbook author specializing in French cuisine for over 35 years. With the support of Julia Child, Willan opened the La Varenne Cooking School in Paris in 1975. In the mid-1970s, as Willan writes in her memoir, “French cuisine was becoming a portal by which Americans were rediscovering the culinary arts after a long dormant period that began in the 1930s with the taming of vegetables in cans, followed by the 1950s and frozen foods. Julia had opened the front and led the battle, and now La Varenne was the place people could have the Julia Child experience, a working laboratory of classical French cuisine.”

As recent guests of the UC San Diego Library, Willan and co-author Amy Friedman offered morsels from Willan’s autobiography, “One Souffle at a Time: A Memoir of Food and France.” Together, they share stories, pictures and secret ingredients to a life well-lived.

With the cooking season upon us, how about trying one Willan’s delicious recipes that you can find here: La Varenne CookingOr check out our favorites below: Happy Holidays everyone!

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Roast Leg of Lamb with White Beans

Roast leg of lamb is the French cook’s pride, paraded for guests, or a birthday, or for family Sunday lunch. To make the most of this expensive cut, a gigot is invariably cooked on the bone, with a clove of garlic tucked into the shank so it permeates the whole roast. The meat may be spiked with more garlic and herbs, and is basted with butter to ensure a golden finish and tasty gravy.

Serves 6 to 8

One 4- to 5-pound/about 2-kilogram leg of lamb

[Read Full Recipe]

 

Winter-Salad-of-Counrty-Ham-with-Beets-Endive-and-Lambs-Lettuce

Winter Salad of Country Ham

Endive and lamb’s lettuce are among the treats of winter, a glimpse of green among the seasonal roots on the vegetable stand. Teamed with beets for color and hazelnuts for crunch, they are a classic French combination, delicious with thinly sliced Virginia or Smithfield ham, or some imported prosciutto.

Serves 4 for supper

70g/2½oz/½ cup hazelnuts

450g/1lb cooked baby beets

[Read Full Recipe]

 

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Volcanic Apples 

These apples are hollowed to the shape of a volcano so they take more stuffing, hence their name in our family. For the filling, I’m calling for muesli as it is so easy to find, but you’ll save a bit of time if you use granola, which is already toasted.  Simply mix it with the other ingredients. You’ll need a tart variety of apple that will be fluffy and juicy when baked; traditional favorites are Rome Beauty or McIntosh (Cox’s or Reine de Reinettes in theUK), though you can always fall back on the ubiquitous Granny Smith.

Serves 4

[Read Full Recipe]

 

Join the conversation on Twitter @UCTelevision, @AnneWillan, & @ucsdlibrary

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OnBeyond: Biology’s Future at UCSD, Natural Reserves, and more!

In this episode of OnBeyond, meet UC San Diego biologist Bill McGinnis, the new Dean of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego. McGinnis is a renowned biologist best known for his 1983 discovery that genes involved in embryonic development are identical in different species, from bugs to humans.

Hear what this cutting edge scientist has to say about where the biological sciences are headed at UC San Diego, from brain activity mapping to mathematical modeling of biological systems. McGinnis talks about his past, his passions, and what he hopes to study more thoroughly in the future.

Next, this episode of OnBeyond explores what is so special about California’s comfortable climate. Only a small portion of the Earth’s landmass is conducive to a Mediterranean climate like that of California, and 40% of these Mediterranean areas are already heavily populated. A mere 1/8 of the entire world’s Mediterranean areas have been preserved.

UCTV then visits two University of California Natural Reserves to reveal the beauty and the biodiversity of these remote preservation and research sites. Watch “OnBeyond: A New Era for Biology, Mediterranean Climate, Natural Reserves” to find out the locations, services, and secrets of these great natural reserve facilities.

If you enjoyed this episode, check out other programs in the OnBeyond series!

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Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason

Conversations with History welcomes UC Berkeley’s Professor Mary Ann Mason to discuss her career as a university official, historian, and lawyer, as well as the changing role of women in academia and society.

Mason says moving to Berkeley at the end of the 60’s raised her awareness of issues, particularly the women’s rights movement, which was just beginning to gain momentum.

She was teaching history at a small college in Oakland when she joined the women’s consciousness raising movement. They held a gathering of women teaching history at four year colleges and they realized what a small group they were. There were only eight of them, in all of California. As for the UCs at the time, Mason reports that there were only 1.3 women historians for each campus.

Throughout her time in Berkeley, Mason watched the equality of women improve. When she got hired as a professor by UC Berkeley in 1989, about 15 percent of the faculty were women, which she reports is a huge improvement from just 2 percent in 1972.

Hear how these cultural and structural changes came about in “Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason.”

Be sure to see what other programs are available in the Conversations with History series!

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In Search of Islamic Justice

The most recent episode of Legally Speaking welcomes human rights lawyer Sadakat Kadri to discuss his 2012 book, Heaven on Earth: A Journey Through Shari’a Law from the Deserts of Ancient Arabia to the Streets of the Modern Muslim World.

Kadri began research for Heaven on Earth in 2008 in an effort to trace the evolution of Shari’a Law. He says the first half of his book is a history of the origins of Shari’a Law, while the second half takes you on Kadri’s journey through Syria, Pakistan, Egypt, and other countries in search of the modern interpretations of Shari’a Law, which he discovered has changed radically in the last forty years.

Click the image to watch “In Search of Islamic Justice-Legally Speaking” to learn more about Kadri’s distinctions between religious law and criminal law within the Shari’a.

See what other programs are available in the Legally Speaking series!

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