Category: Public Affairs

Dirty Sexy Policy

Dirty-Sexy-PolicyDirty Sexy Policy brings together prominent scholars, attorneys, activists, regulators, and journalists to explore current challenges facing media.

Participants and speakers engage in lively discussion and debate through a moderated Q&A to explore content regulation of obscenity and indecency, structural regulation of broadband technologies, and the broader stakes that citizens and policy critics share.

Tune in for each of these shows on UCTV from the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara.

Media Policy and Fetishism
Des Freedman, Professor of Media and Communication at Goldsmiths, University of London, talks about the relationship between media and power together with the political and economic contexts of media policymaking and regulation.

Communications Evolution, Revolution, and the Role of the Academy
Nicholas Johnson was the FCC Commissioner from 1966-1973. He fought for reform by battling the status quo in the broadcasting industry. He takes us from those turbulent times to these. Many of the issues are similar but there are more and different players.

The Politics of Infrastructure
From net neutrality to what broadband means, the politics of the infrastructure we rely on to move information is evolving. A panel of experts discusses the idea that everything should be delivered equally and at the same speed regardless of who is sending it. Though much of the infrastructure is invisible, it has big impacts.

Obscenity and Indecency
How are obscenity and indecency officially defined and what does it mean for the current digital age? How are policies different for adult films and why is the first amendment applied differently?

Content and Conduits
How fast is our internet and how fast could or should it be? Explore the common ground between content and infrastructure policy. What role do the media giants play and how should they be regulated?

Watch more programs from the Carsey-Wolf Center.

VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Goldman Talkers

28277Trained in fiction with an MFA in creative writing, a young Ben Rhodes soon found himself writing foreign policy speeches — first, for a think tank and then later, for the President of the United States. He shares his colorful journey from graduate school to the White House with the 2014 graduates of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.


28272For more non-fiction, check out former Obama advisor and UC Berkeley professor Michael Nacht as he recounts how he explained his career choice to his perplexed father. This, before offering thoughtful analysis on Vladimir Putin’s moves in Ukraine and the impact of new nuclear technologies.


Like these programs? Stay tuned for the late summer launch of The UC Public Policy Channel, anchored by none other than the Goldman School, home of some of the best thinkers and talkers on issues that matter.

VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Join In On Conversations With History

In these lively and unedited interviews, UC Berkeley’s Harry Kreisler welcomes distinguished men and women from all over the world to talk about their lives and their work. Interviews span the globe and include discussion of political, economic, military, legal, cultural, and social issues shaping our world. Harry recently competed his 500th interview, each an in-depth look at the guest’s life from childhood through to the present day. Check out the most recent additions to the UCTV archive.

1761The Warrior State: Pakistan in the
Contemporary World with T.V. Paul

T.V. Paul of McGill University discusses his new book, “The Warrior State: Pakistan in the Contemporary World.” He discusses how Pakistan’s search for parity in its relations with India is critical for understanding why it remains a warrior state mired in a strategic dilemma which subverts its hopes for development at home and security in its regional environment.


1761Leadership with Gro Harlem Brundtland
Gro Harlem Brundtland discusses of her lifelong commitment to public service at the national and international level. She traces her intellectual odyssey and recalls her many roles – Norwegian Prime Minister, Chair of Global Commission on Environment and Development, and Director General of the World Health Organization.


1761Political Theory and Social Criticism with Michael Walzer
One of America’s foremost political thinkers Walzer explores his childhood, education and writing. He talks about the protest movement of the 60s and looks at the 2008 economic collapse from the perspective of a social critic.


1761Understanding Human Nature with Steven Pinker
Harvard psychology professor Pinker conducts research on language and cognition. He discusses growing up in Montreal, the impact of the 1960′s and the trajectory of his research interests. He explains his early work in linguistics and how he came to write his recent work, “The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined.”


1761Scientific Discovery with Carol Greider
Carol Greider shared the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 2009 for the discovery of how chromosomes are protected by telomeres and the enzyme telomerase. She explores what it means to be the daughter of a physics professor and her journey to the Nobel Prize.


1761Technology and Inequality with George Packer
New Yorker staff writer George Packer discuses of the impact of Silicon Valley on society and politics. He explores the implications of technology for the status of the American worker, for American culture, and for economic inequality.


1761Reflections with General James Mattis
General James Mattis (U.S. Marine Corp. ret.), former Head of Central Command discusses his military career, the skill set and temperament required to be a marine and his battle experiences in Afghanistan and Iraq. He also discusses the role of the military in securing peace and the contribution of the military to the policy debate.


1761History, Politics and Law with Charles McCurdy
Professor of History and Law at the University of Virginia, Charles McCurdy discusses the interactions of law and politics in the United States. Case studies discussed include: Justice Stephen Field; The Anti- Rent Era in New York Law (1830-1865); Herbert Wechsler’s article on “The Political Safeguards of Federalism;” and the Sedition Acts of the 1790′s.


1761The Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America with Amy Chua and Jed Rubenfeld
Amy Chua attracted a lot of attention with her book “Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.” She and her husband, fellow Yale Law School Professor Jed Rubenfeld, have written a new book, “The Triple Package” in which they explain the rise and fall of certain cultural groups, primarily, second generation recent immigrants to the U.S.


1761Congress and Foreign Policy with Congressman Howard Berman
Congressman Howard Berman discusses his 30 year career in the U.S. House of Representatives serving California’s 28th congressional district.

VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

20 Years of NAFTA and Beyond – Mexico Moving Forward 2014

8120NAFTA’s impact on the last two decades and its effect on the future are featured prominently in this year’s UCSD-TV series, Mexico Moving Forward. Listen to business leaders, scholars, and social entrepreneurs provide diverse perspectives on the current economic challenges in Mexico, what can and is being done to address them, and how these lessons can be applied globally.

The daylong symposium covered a wide range of topics, from NAFTA’s economic impact, foreign investment potential, prospective ties to Asia, to arts and culture, including a surprise flash mob opera performance by the Opera Ambulante in Tijuana.

The symposium, hosted by the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies (IR/PS), features University of California President Janet Napolitano, UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla and IR/PS Dean Peter Cowhey, as well as experts from both sides of the border.

Tune in for one or all of the Mexico Moving Forward programs at http://www.ucsd.tv/mexico-moving-forward.

VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)

Mexico: Twenty Years After NAFTA

27717This year marks the 20th anniversary of the North American Free Trade Agreement, an important milestone for the U.S., Mexican, and Canadian regional economic partnership.

Before NAFTA was launched 20 years ago, critics worried that the United States would lose jobs and more to the south, to Mexico. That did not happen. In fact, employment rose, commercial ties with Canada and Mexico nearly tripled, and the national economies became more integrated in some industries.

Despite these and other benefits, concerns remain and the pact continues to be controversial. As part of its ongoing Master Class series, “Mexico: Twenty Years After NAFTA,” the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute presents Mexico — Drugs and Violence — Can Recent Progress be Sustained? with David Mares.

Tune in to hear David Mares, director of the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies at UC San Diego, discuss NAFTA’s effect on drugs and violence in Mexico and how recent progress is fundamental to Mexico’s future and of great interest to the United States.

This series is presented by The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute and the Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies at UC San Diego.

VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0.0/10 (0 votes cast)
VN:F [1.9.3_1094]
Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)