Category Archives: UC San Francisco

The Hacking of the American Mind

8232We first met Dr. Lusting in 2009 when UCTV presented his “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” lecture. That viral video now has over 7 million YouTube views, and more every day.

His latest program, “The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains,” coincides with the publishing of his new book of the same title.

In this half-hour interview, Lustig, a UCSF endocrinologist, explores the reward system in our brains – serotonin, cortisol, and dopamine – chemicals that drive our pleasure-seeking behaviors including overeating, drug use, and that ever-present cell phone. But he goes beyond just neural pathways and brain chemistry to impute the underlying economic machine that creates industries that profit off processed foods full of sugar.

He recommends a “four Cs” solution — connect, contribute, cope, and cook — urging a slowed-down lifestyle for the sake of our health and happiness.

In addition to the interview “The Hacking of the American Mind”, you may enjoy these short videos:

The Difference Between Happiness and Pleasure
Corporate Responsibility vs. Individual Responsibility
Are All Calories the Same?
Responsibility of the Food Industry
Processed Food and Pleasure

For a deeper dive, watch the video that started it all and other programs with Dr. Robert Lustig:
Sugar: The Bitter Truth
The Skinny on Obesity
Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0

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A Life in Medicine

8232Healthcare has never been as important to peoples’ lives as it is today. Staggering advances in technology and science stand alongside major changes — and controversies — in policy and payment. In this new series, Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of UCSF’s Department of Medicine, bestselling author, and rated in 2015 by Modern Healthcare magazine as the most influential physician-executive in the U.S., interviews leading lights in medicine and healthcare.

In addition to finding out what’s happening now and where medicine is going, these individuals talk about the experiences that shaped their careers.

The first two programs are available now with more coming monthly to UCTV.

Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo
From self-described army brat to a renowned physician and scientist, Dr. Bibbins-Domingo is the immediate past-chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force. Find out how she balances the various demands on her time, including being a mom.

Dr. Lloyd “Holly” Smith
Dr. Smith came to San Francisco in 1964 and transformed UCSF into a world leader. His ability to steer that change is as much about management as medicine.

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Inspiration and Expertise – Conversations with UCSF Authors

8232What makes a world-class physician or scientist decide to write a book for the wide world of readers? Where do they find the inspiration and the time? What do they hope to accomplish? How do the satisfactions of writing compare to practicing medicine or writing scholarly articles?

Six recently published UCSF authors tackle these questions and more in these fascinating interviews:

Life After the Diagnosis: Expert Advice on Living Well with Serious Illness for Patients and Caregivers

Patients and caregivers living well with serious illness

Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives and Where to Draw the Line
The potential overuse of medical care and when to say “enough”

The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age
The impact of technology and the digital revolution on health and health care

Sensing Light
The impact of AIDS in San Francisco through the eyes of three fictional doctors

Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon
The consequences of hazardous manufacturing and poisonous materials on public health

Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America
The role of the pharmaceutical industry in creating a new disease, short stature, to sell new a medication.

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Move Better, Feel Better

8232If you’re in pain, surgery may not be your only option. Many conditions, such as low back pain, dizziness, and osteoarthritis have been shown to respond as well or better to physical therapy than medications or surgery. Physical therapy often complements these interventions and offers far fewer side effects.

Learn how physical therapists develop treatment plans and implement techniques that improve movement, reduce pain, restore function, and help prevent future injury in individuals of all ages and in many settings. Taught by experts from the UCSF Faculty Practice in Physical Therapy, this new series highlights the wide variety of medical conditions that physical therapists can effectively treat using the latest research and proven approaches.

Train the Brain: Exploring the Brain-Body Connection in Neurological Rehabilitation: UCSF Physical Therapists Catherine Printz and Monika Patel explore neurological physical therapy.

When Your World Spins Out of Control: How Your Inner Ear and Brain Work Together for Perception, Balance, and Movement: UCSF Physical Therapists explore the how the inner ear works with the brain in an effort to help patients with perception, balance and movement.

Getting Under Your Skin: The Role of Fascia in Movement and Function: Fascia, or connective tissue, helps muscles communicate. See how to keep this important part of your body supple to improve your mobility and decrease pain.

Back to Basics: Guidelines For a Healthy Spine: Lower back pain (LBP) remains the most common cause of disability and lost work time among working-age adults in industrialized countries. Find out what you can do to reduce your LBP.

Rebooting Pelvic Health: Staying Continent and Pain-Free: Pelvic floor dysfunction physical therapists provide tips for maintaining pelvic health to stay continent and pain-free.

“Too Fit to Fracture”: Guidelines for Skeletal Health and Aging: Orthopedic clinical specialist Wendy Katzman looks at avoiding fractures in older age with a focus on skeletal health.

Explore more programs in Move Better, Feel Better: What Can Physical Therapy Do For You?

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Healthy Bones & Joints

8232Bone and joint problems are among the most common medical maladies, affecting more than 1.7 billion people worldwide. Whether it’s due to an accident or fall, a workplace, sports, and war-related injury, or caused by disease, one out of every two Americans head to the physician’s office seeking help for musculoskeletal problems.

In this new Mini Medical School series from UC San Francisco, Bones and Joints: Injury, Repair and Keeping Them Healthy, you’ll learn more about common issues in bone and joint injuries, and get an in-depth glimpse at what’s being done to improve patient care and outcomes.

Pain Management: Explore pain management options for the common orthopaedic conditions of low back pain and knee osteoarthritis.

The Skeleton: The skeleton is remarkably engineered to provide structural support, protect vital parts and facilitate movement. Discover bone biomechanics and how we can leverage the properties of bone to better engineer skeletal repair.

Trauma: Learn about trauma and bone injuries in North America and internationally. See what research is being done to improve care of patients with bone injuries.

Diabetes: Diabetes complications include limb disorders. Find out about preventative measures for diabetic foot care, and diabetic amputation.

Spine, Neck and Lower Back Injuries: Doctors from UCSF department of Orthopaedic Surgery look at injuries to the spine, neck and lower back.

A Look Inside the Orthopaedic Trauma Institute: Meet some of the of UCSF Orthopaedic Department surgeons, as they review the educational programs, basic research, clinical research and outreach programs at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center.

Explore all episodes of Bones and Joints: Injury, Repair and Keeping Them Healthy.

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