Category Archives: UC San Francisco

Oh, Our Aging Bones

Starting at about 30 years old, the density of bones begins to decline. As a result, bones become more fragile and are more likely to break. There are over seven million fractures in the United States every year. With a more physically active and increasingly aging population, we are seeing an increasing number of fractures in the elderly. Treatment of older patients, however, often requires different approaches than similar injuries in younger adults.

This series features orthopedists from UCSF who discuss common fractures in the elderly throughout the body: knee, ankle, spine, pelvis, wrist, elbow, shoulder and hip. They address common issues in bone injuries, how they are treated and what you can do to help prevent fractures.

Get an in-depth update as to what is being done to improve the care of geriatric patients with fractures.

Browse the series of programs in Aging Bones: Understanding Fractures, Healing, and Repair

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FoodGate: The Problem with the US Food System

You can’t fix healthcare until you fix health. You can’t fix health until you fix the diet. And you can’t fix the diet until you know what’s wrong. What went wrong? FoodGate.

Endocrinologist Robert Lustig, Dentist Cristen Kearns and Health Policy Expert Laura Schmidt team up to explore how the US food system has led to higher rates in obesity and related metabolic diseases in the last 50 years.

Preventable disease rates keep going up, even while behaviors have improved: smoking rates are down, cholesterol and blood pressure are down, and physical activity is up. We should be reaping a health benefit, but we’re not. The primary reason: we’re eating too many refined carbohydrates and too much sugar.

How did the food system come to encourage this? Pharmaceutical companies benefit from long-term drug treatment of metabolic diseases. Organizations such as the Sugar Association and the Beverage Association fund questionable scientific studies to convince the public that obesity and sugar are not related. These efforts include funding aggressive marketing campaigns to influence public policy. According to Schmidt, they spent 31 million dollars in a single election to convince voters in San Francisco and Oakland not to support a soda tax.

But there is hope. Research into the effects of too much sugar is getting attention, thanks to the efforts of Dr. Lustig and others. There are many parallels between this issue and smoking. According to Schmidt, we’re about where we were in 1970. The tide is slowly shifting, but we have a long way to go. Policy-makers are just now beginning to recognize the negative consequences of an unhealthy populace on healthcare costs and future social security benefits. Lustig advises, “You want social security? Stop drinking soda and tell all your friends to do so, too.”

Watch FoodGate: The Break-in, the Cover-up, and the Aftermath.

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The Hacking of the American Mind

8232We first met Dr. Lusting in 2009 when UCTV presented his “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” lecture. That viral video now has over 7 million YouTube views, and more every day.

His latest program, “The Hacking of the American Mind: The Science Behind the Corporate Takeover of Our Bodies and Brains,” coincides with the publishing of his new book of the same title.

In this half-hour interview, Lustig, a UCSF endocrinologist, explores the reward system in our brains – serotonin, cortisol, and dopamine – chemicals that drive our pleasure-seeking behaviors including overeating, drug use, and that ever-present cell phone. But he goes beyond just neural pathways and brain chemistry to impute the underlying economic machine that creates industries that profit off processed foods full of sugar.

He recommends a “four Cs” solution — connect, contribute, cope, and cook — urging a slowed-down lifestyle for the sake of our health and happiness.

In addition to the interview “The Hacking of the American Mind”, you may enjoy these short videos:

The Difference Between Happiness and Pleasure
Corporate Responsibility vs. Individual Responsibility
Are All Calories the Same?
Responsibility of the Food Industry
Processed Food and Pleasure

For a deeper dive, watch the video that started it all and other programs with Dr. Robert Lustig:
Sugar: The Bitter Truth
The Skinny on Obesity
Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0

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A Life in Medicine

8232Healthcare has never been as important to peoples’ lives as it is today. Staggering advances in technology and science stand alongside major changes — and controversies — in policy and payment. In this new series, Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of UCSF’s Department of Medicine, bestselling author, and rated in 2015 by Modern Healthcare magazine as the most influential physician-executive in the U.S., interviews leading lights in medicine and healthcare.

In addition to finding out what’s happening now and where medicine is going, these individuals talk about the experiences that shaped their careers.

The first two programs are available now with more coming monthly to UCTV.

Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo
From self-described army brat to a renowned physician and scientist, Dr. Bibbins-Domingo is the immediate past-chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force. Find out how she balances the various demands on her time, including being a mom.

Dr. Lloyd “Holly” Smith
Dr. Smith came to San Francisco in 1964 and transformed UCSF into a world leader. His ability to steer that change is as much about management as medicine.

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Inspiration and Expertise – Conversations with UCSF Authors

8232What makes a world-class physician or scientist decide to write a book for the wide world of readers? Where do they find the inspiration and the time? What do they hope to accomplish? How do the satisfactions of writing compare to practicing medicine or writing scholarly articles?

Six recently published UCSF authors tackle these questions and more in these fascinating interviews:

Life After the Diagnosis: Expert Advice on Living Well with Serious Illness for Patients and Caregivers

Patients and caregivers living well with serious illness

Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives and Where to Draw the Line
The potential overuse of medical care and when to say “enough”

The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age
The impact of technology and the digital revolution on health and health care

Sensing Light
The impact of AIDS in San Francisco through the eyes of three fictional doctors

Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon
The consequences of hazardous manufacturing and poisonous materials on public health

Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America
The role of the pharmaceutical industry in creating a new disease, short stature, to sell new a medication.

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