Category Archives: UCLA

UCTV’s Most Watched Programs of 2013

It’s been another fantastic year of enlightening content. Here’s a recap of UCTV’s most watched programs of 2013:

24549Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment

Mario D. Garrett, PhD discusses the scientific revolution currently happening in dementia studies, dementia errors that impact research, and the importance of social interaction for patients with dementia.

25329 Concussions and Sports

 Clinical neuropsychologist Eric Freitag of Sport Concussion Program explains the risks and medical implications of concussions. Learn how to spot a concussion, when to see a doctor, and how treatment should progress.

24975 Is the Human Mind Unique?

Cognitive abilities often regarded as unique to humans include humor, morality, symbolism, creativity, and preoccupation with the minds of others. In these compelling talks, emphasis is placed on the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness.

25788 Brain Mapping:  Pushing the Frontiers of Neurology — Atlantic Meets the Pacific 2013

UC San Diego neuroscientists Ralph Greenspan and Nicholas Spitzer join Kris Famm of GlaxoSmithKline and James Fallows of The Atlantic for a look into the future of brain research. This program is part of The Atlantic Meets the Pacific 2013 series presented by The Atlantic and UCSD.

25193 Big Bang – UC Davis Business Plan Competition 2013

Big Bang! is the annual UC Davis Business Plan Competition, hosted by the UC Davis Child Family Institute for Innovation and Entrepreneurship and organized by MBA students of the Graduate School of Management. Find out the winners of this year’s competition.

25130 Immunology 101: The Basics and Introduction to our Patient

Katherine Gundling, MD, Associate Clinical Professor of Allergy and Immunology at UCSF, and Practice Chief of the Allergy/Immunology clinic at Moffitt Hospital examines the essential purpose of the immune system and how living with a primary disorder of immunity can affect daily life.

24925 The Age of Amazon with Marc Onetto

Marc Onetto, senior vice president of worldwide operations and customer service at Amazon.com, shares Amazon’s secrets to success. Hosted by the UC Davis Graduate School of Management’s Dean’s Distinguished Speaker Series.


25202The Future of Human Space Exploration

Charles Kennel, Former Scripps Institution of Oceanography director and chair of the National Academy’s Space Science Board, reviews what NASA’s space program has accomplished, what it is doing now, and what the future holds for human space exploration.

25319 Bike Fit: It’s All About the Bike

Curtis Cramblett, PT, CFMT, CSCS has been an avid cyclist and racer for more than 20 years and has spent thousands of hours on his bike. He shares his expertise on proper bike fit including what a good bike fit feels like, your biomechanical needs, and adjusting your bike to your body.

24900 Tracy DiNunzio, Co-Founder and CEO of Tradesy

Tracy DiNunzio, Founder and CEO of Tradesy a fashion resale website, talks about what it took to get her company off the ground. She is also the CEO and founder of Recycled Bride, the Web’s largest wedding resale marketplace, which launched in 2009.

24972 An Evening of Sacred Music and Dances from Japan Kagura Ensemble of Chichibu Shrine

Enjoy this unique opportunity to experience Kagura (sacred music and ritual dances) from Chichibu, in the first and only US performance of the shrine’s Kagura troupe. Chichibu Kagura, dating back to approximately the seventeenth century, with a repertory based on ancient myths, has been designated by the government as an Important Formless Folkloric Cultural Property.

24923 Is Beer In Your Career?

What opportunities are in the burgeoning craft brewing industry? In this Career Channel presentation, you’ll learn the answers from a panel of experts that includes Stone Brewing founder Greg Koch, Lost Abbey brewer Tomme Arthur, Ballast Point brewer and co-founder Yuseff Cherney, and the founder of White Labs Inc. Pure Yeast and Fermentation, Chris White.

25125 HIV: A Primer

Dr. Jay Levyan, an AIDS and cancer researcher at UCSF, discusses the discovery of HIV and its basic science. Then, Dr. C. Bradley Hare, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Medical Director, UCSF HIV/AIDS Division at San Francisco General Hospital, explores HIV and its diseases through case presentations from the clinic.

25071 Intellectual Journey with Gary Becker  – Conversations with History

Harry Kreisler welcomes Nobel Laureate Gary S. Becker for a discussion of his intellectual journey. Topics include: Milton Friedman, his early work on discrimination, the skills and temperament required for work in economics, applying economic analysis to social problems, the Chicago school of economics, creativity, rational choice theory, markets vs. government, the impact of ideas on policy, the communications revolution, and the lessons of the 2008 economic collapse.

24920 Farming in the 21st Century: A Woman’s Perspective from South Africa

Brylyne Chitsunge is an internationally acclaimed expert and facilitator of the Nigeria-South Africa Group on Agriculture and a tireless advocate for farmers in her native South Africa. Chitsunge counts herself among the 70 percent of farmers who are women in South Africa. Despite the challenges,  she was able to buy her own land and works as a farmer and breeder of Kalahari Red goats, Nguni cattle, free range poultry, indigenous pigs and most recently Tilapia fish.

25297 UCSB 2013 Summit on Energy Efficiency – Steven Chu

Opening Keynote by Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy ’09-’13 and Professor at Stanford University, titled Materials Science Innovations in Energy Efficiency and Generation. Conference hosted in May, 2013 by the UCSB Institute for Energy Efficiency. 

25641Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0

Dr. Robert Lustig, UCSF Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, updates his very popular video Sugar: The Bitter Truth. He argues that sugar and processed foods are driving the obesity epidemic, which in turn affects our endocrine system. In UCTV’s documentary, The Skinny on Obesity, Dr. Lustig and his colleagues discuss the root causes of the obesity epidemic.

Thanks for watching! Join the conversation on FaceBook and Twitter. 

 

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LA’s Climate Future

When we hear about polar ice caps melting, it sounds dangerous but also distant. The damage to our planet’s ecosystem caused by increasing levels of carbon dioxide is real, but we don’t see it.

It’s hard for people to take climate change seriously because it’s not immediately and directly affecting our lives, YET.

In order to give people a taste of what might happen when the consequences of global warming hit home, UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability presents an in depth analysis of what LA’s climate could look like, if global warming continues in the direction it is going.

With sea levels rising, and temperatures increasing as well, what will the 3.82 million residents of Los Angeles have to look forward to?

Find out in “LA’s Climate Future: What’s Coming and What Choices We Face” as UCLA professor Alex Hall presents his high resolution predictions of what happens when the effects of climate change hit LA.

Check out other videos from UCLA Institute of the Environment and Sustainability!

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UCLA’s School of Nursing Combats TB on Skid Row

UCLA’s School of Nursing has partnered with the Union Rescue Mission to provide tuberculosis testing for those on Skid Row. The UCLA Newsroom gives us an inside look at the clinic within the Union Rescue Mission and the work they are doing to combat a recent outbreak of TB in the area.

“The first shoot we had scheduled was in Gladys Park a few blocks away from the clinic. They do an outreach when the park opens up and they offer testing,” said Sebastian Hernandez, Manager of the Broadcast Studio, who was involved in the filming of this documentary.

UCLA Today reports, “Public health officials have identified 78 TB cases that have occurred on skid row in 2007-2012. Of those cases, 60 people were homeless. And of those 60, 11 died of TB. All of these cases could have been treated with medication, the county reported.”

The School of Nursing offers testing to all who are willing, whether or not they are staying at the mission.

“It’s a different reality down there [in Gladys Park]. It’s a shady part of town, but you recognize that they are just people trying to cope. It was different inside the mission. People are more at ease. It feels like a safer place for the people living there.”

Hernandez says that the rescue mission seems like it can be a launching pad to get people off the streets and presents them with many different health care services.

“It’s valuable to recognize that there are a bunch of different steps involved in addressing homelessness and all the issues surrounding it. They seem to do a good job of giving the residents the comprehensive care that they need,” says Hernandez. “We need to be aware that a process is necessary and no ‘one free lunch program’ is going to solve the issue. People can mention how homelessness is sad but I hope that seeing this can inspire people to really get beyond guilt and actively support broad policies that address homelessness.”

Watch “UCLA Faces TB Outbreak on Skid Row in LA” to get a glimpse of what life is like inside the Union Rescue Mission.

See what other programs on infectious diseases are available on UCTV Prime.

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Bruin Talk Takes a Look at Women’s Sports

School’s out for Summer but these Bruin athletes never stop!

This Bruin Talk takes a special focus on women’s sports as a new sport is added to the NCAA, Sand Volleyball.

Freshmen Karly Drolson and Rachel Inouye talk about the addition of Sand Volleyball just in time for summer.

Madeline Brooks joins the show to talk about this year’s prospects for Bruins Women’s basketball.

Don’t miss the line up of upcoming Bruin’s sporting events, in Bruin Talk June 2013.

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The Real History of Cinco de Mayo

Before you crack open that Corona or dip that tortilla chip in some tasty guacamole, maybe it’s time you understood what Cinco de Mayo is really all about.

Why is it that a holiday commemorating an 1862 Mexican victory over the French at Puebla is so widely celebrated in California and across the United States, when it’s scarcely observed in Mexico?

In this episode of UCLA’s SubtextDavid E. Hayes-Bautista, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA, sheds some light on the origins of this annual celebration, revealing that the holiday is not Mexican at all, but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the mid-nineteenth century.

The truth may not change your May 5th party plans, but at least you’ll know what you’re celebrating!

Watch “The History of Cinco de Mayo,” online now.

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