Category Archives: University of California

Eating for Health and The Skinny on Obesity

750The UCTV series Eating for Health and The Skinny on Obesity are excellent resources for those eager to live healthy and prevent common nutrition related illnesses. In today’s world, it is easy to fall prey to the temptations of comfort foods and drinks. Dr. Robert Baron, UCSF Associate Dean for Graduate and Continuing Medical Education, values the opportunity to share results from the latest scientific research regarding nutrition to help people make healthier choices in their everyday lives.

25717Internationally known endocrinologist and star lecturer of the popular UCTV video, Sugar: The Bitter Truth, Dr. Robert Lustig analyzes the issue of obesity in the new documentary, The Complete Skinny on Obesity. Dr. Lustig and his UCSF colleagues Elissa Epel and Barbara Laraia explain why what we eat is just as important as how much we eat and look into the effects of stress and other factors on obesity rates.. Learn about the root causes of obesity, and why experts anticiapte that the next generation will die significantly younger than it’s predecessor due to obesity its related health issues.

25641Powered by the UCSF Osher Mini Medical School for the Public, Eating for Health is a new series that explores the topics of health and nutrition, as well as the prevention and treatment of common nutrition-related illnesses. In Fat Chance: Fructose 2.0, Dr. Lustig gives an update on the effects of processed sugar on our hormone systems and how this contributes to obesity. Read How Sweet is Sweet? for more information about everyday sweeteners.

Be sure to visit Eating for Health and The Skinny on Obesity websites for more from UCSF’s doctors, nurses and nutritionists as they explore eating for health (and pleasure).

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Global Food Systems with Mary Robinson

Over one billion people today are undernourished. That means roughly one in seven people across the globe eat roughly one meal a day, if that.

Children in developing countries live with chronic hunger that stunts growth and weakens immune systems, while more and more people in wealthy countries grow obese. But there are starving children in wealthy countries too – families living on food stamps, making it impossible to ignore the inequality between the wealthy and the poor. As food becomes scarce, families are forced to eat cheaper, less nutritious meals, which can have devastating long-term affects on entire populations.

Within the past few years, we have witnessed food shortages like the global food crisis of 2008 and the East Africa food crisis of 2011. In Haiti in 2008, food prices rose to 50-100% of their normal price, which led to unrest, violence, and the ousting of the Prime Minister. Although some things like drought or infestations of vermin can be blamed for food shortages, many of the causes are man-made and avoidable.

Mary Robinson, formerly the first female President of Ireland and now the President of the Mary Robinson Foundation, speaks at the University of California Global Food Systems Forum to discuss these issues with experts and fellow human rights activists.

Robinson warns that climate change will only make matters worse. Rising sea levels will swallow up potential farm lands while increasing temperatures will turn farm lands to deserts. Watch “Mary Robinson – Global Food Systems” to learn more about the challenges ahead.

Check out other videos about how gardening and agriculture must feed our growing population.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

The Importance of Mentoring Women and Minority Faculty

Ever since the late 1970’s women have outnumbered men in college enrollments. That number has been steadily increasing to reach a male to female ratio of 43.6 to 56.4 in public universities and a nearly 40-60 split in private universities, based on 2008 enrollment data from the Digest of Education Statistics.

If women have consistently outnumbered men in college student populations for decades, why are the faculties of colleges dominated by men?

Dr. Shirley Malcom, head of Education and Human Resources, American Association for the Advancement of Science visits the University of California Office of the President to give a lecture in part with UC ADVANCE PAID, a program sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF), that enables campuses to recruit, retain and advance more women and underrepresented minority women faculty in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

Watch as Dr. Malcom discusses “The Importance of Mentoring Women and Minority Faculty at Every Career Stage,” making the case that universities need to have a faculty that reflects the student population, meaning that they should be as diverse as the student body they teach.

Be sure to catch other videos in the series, Mentoring Faculty in an Inclusive Climate: Supporting Women and URM STEM Faculty at UC.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Earth’s Most “Official” of Days

Climate Change on UCTVIt gives to us every hour of every day, but today – Earth Day – is the day we set aside to give back.

While it’s true that the home base for human beings has its share of challenges, many of its citizens — including researchers at the University of California — are working to preserve and conserve it for future generations.

Discover some of what these UC folk are up to at UCTV’s Climate video library. From the atmosphere up above, to the deepest parts of the sea – and everything that exists in between — you’ll discover something new about your planet on its “official” day.

Why not start out with one of these new UCTV programs?

Restoring the Gulf Marshes
UC Berkeley graduate student Thomas Azwell is helping to restore the Gulf of Mexico’s marshes after they were severely damaged by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill from April to July of 2010. Partnering with researchers and agencies in the Gulf, the Environmental Science student is staking tubes of cotton netting stuffed with pre-composted sugar cane fiber into the dying marshes of Louisiana, testing whether the environmentally sustainable waste material can give a larger variety of plants a better chance at healing the oil-damaged wetlands.

Silent Spring + 50: Lessons from San Diego’s Bees and Bays
San Diego Coastkeeper’s Jill Witkowski and Dr. James Nieh of UC San Diego address two major environmental problems in the region – water pollution and the devastating effect of parasites and pesticides (research conducted by former UCSD graduate student, Daren Eiri) on the honey bee population. Both presentations shed light on how members of the public can work with San Diego researchers to protect our natural resources and create a more sustainable community.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

UC and the BRAIN Initiative

Yesterday, President Barack Obama announced his plans to create a bold, $100 million public-private initiative to better understand the brain and the diseases that affect it. Appropriately called BRAIN (for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), the group brings together experts across private industry, academia and government agencies in the areas of neuroscience, neurotechnology and neuroscience.

You can bet a good portion of that research will take place within the University of California, where researchers are already deeply entrenched in unlocking the mysteries within the human brain. How do we know? Because many of these same researchers have shared their fascinating discoveries in autism, alzheimer’s, neurology, and mental health and psychiatry with UCTV viewers for years.

And it seems our viewers are always hungry for more. UCTV’s Human Brain iTunes feed consistently shows up in iTunesU’s Top 10 Collections and “What’s Hot” sections.

No doubt that President Obama’s endorsement will mean even more exciting discoveries — and UCTV programs — to come. In the meantime, subscribe to our Human Brain feed in iTunes and browse our archive of Neurology programs at our website. There’s plenty to keep your brain busy!

facebooktwittergoogle_plus