Tag Archives: health matters

Sleep Apnea on Health Matters

8232Do you wake up in the morning tired and unrested? If so, sleep apnea may be to blame.

Though conventionally thought of as a condition that only affects older, overweight men, sleep apnea can affect anyone of any age, weight, or gender. Insufficient sleep due to sleep apnea can affect not just your day to day life but also your long-term health.

Dr. Robert Owens joins our host Dr. David Granet to discuss how much sleep we really need, how sleep apnea affects the body, as well as new techniques for diagnosing and treating sleep apnea. Go inside the UCSD Sleep Medicine Center and see how sleep tests are conducted and get the lowdown on the latest medical devices to help you get a good night’s rest.

Watch Sleep Apnea on Health Matters.

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Silicone Breast Implants and the Politics of Risk

8232Silicone, not to be confused with Silicon, a chemical element that exists in nature, was first polymerized in the late 19th century. Not much was done with it until the 1930s when a chemist at Dow Corning refined it for use as a lubricant in submarines and planes. The first known medical use of silicone was during World War II as a lubricant for glass syringes.

Since then, silicone has regularly been used in electronics, cookware, the automotive industry, and especially in the medical field due to its biocompatibility. Silicone is used in liquid form as a lubricant, and in gel form as bandages, dressings, breast implants, contact lenses and more. Because silicone is extremely biocompatible, studies have shown no marked harmful effects on humans or the environment.

Despite the science, in the 1980’s several diseases were directly attributed to breast implants. Fear and panic spread as the media spun stories of breast implants causing various maladies even though existing research did not corroborate the reports.

Surgeon and historian Jack C. Fisher, author of Silicone on Trial: Breast Implants and the Politics of Risk, sits down with Dr. David Granet to discuss the controversial history of silicone medical devices – including breast implants. Though the fear surrounding their usage was unwarranted and not based in scientific fact, battles waged about their safety and government regulation followed suit. Dr. Fisher argues that regulatory policy should rely on valid science and not on the fear of risk.

Watch Silicone Breast Implants and the Politics of Risk, and browse more programs on Health Matters.

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It’s National Immunization Awareness Month

Are you up to date on all your vaccines?

Shots are extremely important for infants in order to ensure the prevention of illness when their newborn immune systems are so vulnerable.  Hear from Dr. Lisa Stellwagen, clinical professor of pediatrics and medical director of Newborn Services at UC San Diego, in this episode of Health Matters to learn about what vaccines a newborn needs.

It’s also important for children to be up to date on vaccines before starting school, as children with vaccine-preventable illnesses can be denied attendance. The Vaccines for Children program has been federally funded to provide free vaccines to children of low-income families. Learn about recommended and mandatory vaccines for children in “Safety of Childhood Vaccines.”

Remember that shots are not just for kids. People of all ages need to keep track of their immunization record to be sure that they are protecting themselves from deadly diseases. Dr. Lisa Winston of UCSF’s Division of Infectious Diseases explains the need for different vaccines at different stages of life in “Vaccines for Adults and Adolescents.”

If you are planning to go on an exotic vacation, watch “Travel Medicine-Health Matters” as you might need to get extra vaccines before you expose yourself to unfamiliar pathogens.

Check out other programs with information on immunization on UCSD-TV.

Learn more about National Immunization Awareness Month at the Center for Disease Control.

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Combating Cardiac Arrest

What kills more people than AIDS, breast cancer, and lung cancer combined? Cardiac arrest.

Cardiac arrest is the heart’s inability to contract properly which causes the blood to stop circulating. When this occurs, the brain doesn’t receive oxygen which can lead to death in a matter of minutes. Cardiac arrest kills an average of 1,000 people every day.

In this episode of Health Matters, Dr. David Granet and his guest, Dr. Ulrika Birgersdotter-Green, introduce the newest device called an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator that could help save lives.

Watch “Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators and Sudden Cardiac Death” to discover how it works in conjunction with the heart’s electrical system and learn tips for lowering your risk of cardiac arrest.

Check out other programs about cardiology on UCSD-TV.

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