Tag Archives: history

Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason

Conversations with History welcomes UC Berkeley’s Professor Mary Ann Mason to discuss her career as a university official, historian, and lawyer, as well as the changing role of women in academia and society.

Mason says moving to Berkeley at the end of the 60’s raised her awareness of issues, particularly the women’s rights movement, which was just beginning to gain momentum.

She was teaching history at a small college in Oakland when she joined the women’s consciousness raising movement. They held a gathering of women teaching history at four year colleges and they realized what a small group they were. There were only eight of them, in all of California. As for the UCs at the time, Mason reports that there were only 1.3 women historians for each campus.

Throughout her time in Berkeley, Mason watched the equality of women improve. When she got hired as a professor by UC Berkeley in 1989, about 15 percent of the faculty were women, which she reports is a huge improvement from just 2 percent in 1972.

Hear how these cultural and structural changes came about in “Achieving Equality for Women with Mary Ann Mason.”

Be sure to see what other programs are available in the Conversations with History series!

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The Real History of Cinco de Mayo

Before you crack open that Corona or dip that tortilla chip in some tasty guacamole, maybe it’s time you understood what Cinco de Mayo is really all about.

Why is it that a holiday commemorating an 1862 Mexican victory over the French at Puebla is so widely celebrated in California and across the United States, when it’s scarcely observed in Mexico?

In this episode of UCLA’s SubtextDavid E. Hayes-Bautista, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA, sheds some light on the origins of this annual celebration, revealing that the holiday is not Mexican at all, but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the mid-nineteenth century.

The truth may not change your May 5th party plans, but at least you’ll know what you’re celebrating!

Watch “The History of Cinco de Mayo,” online now.

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Zoom Through Time

What if you could explore the entire span of history — both human and planetary — with just a few mouse clicks?

That’s the idea behind ChronoZoom, a zoomable, multimedia timeline conceived by UC Berkeley student Roland Saekow to help visualize history and to assist researchers in viewing large amounts of data to find new historical connections.

UC Berkeley geology professor Walter Alvarez and his students have teamed up with Microsoft Research Connections engineers to make this web-based software possible, and you can see just how far they’ve come in the latest video from UCTV Prime.

Then have some fun poking around the Beta version on the ChronoZoom website. What slice of history will you click to?

Watch “ChronoZoom: A Timeline for Big History.” And visit the UCTV Prime website for more video snapshots from the University of California.

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History in the Making: Libya in the Time of Revolution

For better or for worse, we live in a time of history-making moments, especially in the Middle East. Our long-running UC Berkeley series “Conversations with History” has been recording the voices of those making and uncovering history for more than 500 episodes and the latest installment, “Libya in a Time of Revolution,” is no exception.

Host Harry Kreisler welcomes war correspondent Lindsey Hilsum, who offers her first-person account of the revolution in Libya that toppled the dictator Colonel Muammar Gaddafi. In this fascinating interview, Hilsum, who chronicles her adventure in the book Sandstorm, discusses Gaddafi’s 40-year reign of terror and his role as an international actor. She then traces the factors that led to his fall, emphasizing Libyan nationalism, the Arab spring and the intervention of external powers, and analyzes the role of journalists in the continuing worldwide struggle for human dignity. Hilsum concludes with a discussion of what she learned from her experiences in the country and speculates on Libya’s future and how external intervention can bring about change in places like Syria.

Watch Conversations with History: Libya in the Time of Revolution with Lindsey Hilsum.

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Cesar Chavez and the Community Service Organization

Tomorrow is a holiday in the State of California. While some of us may have the day off, work will be at the top of our minds as we honor Latino labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar E. Chavez, who was born on March 31, 1927.

Chavez is an inspirational figure to so many — especially here in California, where he co-founded the organization that would become the United Farm Workers (UFW). But what inspired him to transition from farm worker to labor organizer?

Using archival footage, oral history interviews and more, the documentary “Organize! The Lessons of the Community Service Organization” looks at the pivotal grassroots effort launched in the 1940’s that empowered a generation of Mexican-Americans, including Chavez. Poor immigrants were able to move into the mainstream of American society through voter registration drives, lawsuits and legislative campaigns. Over 50 years later, the leaders of the movement reflect on the impact.

Take this opportunity to host your own Cesar Chavez Day celebration by watching the documentary. You might also want to browse around the Cesar Chavez learning resources put together by the California Departement of Education.

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