Tag Archives: Latino

Honoring the Legacy of an Urban Planning Pioneer

Leo Estrada built a legacy fighting for civil rights, voting rights and equal representation for Latinos during his 40-years at the Luskin School of Public Affairs at UCLA. Estrada was a pioneer in the field of urban planning, providing his expertise to the U.S. Census Bureau throughout his career. Estrada passed away in 2018, and the Luskin School established a fellowship in his honor, proving support to underrepresented graduate students in the Department of Urban Planning. Recently, the Luskin School paid tribute to Estrada with a daylong symposium centered around the lessons of his work.

The New Majority & the 2020 Census: Shifting the Balance of Power

In his keynote address, Arturo Vargas, president and CEO of the NALEO Educational Fund discusses the importance of the census, and the long history of efforts to avoid counting immigrants and minorities. Indeed, the Hispanic origin question was only added to the census in the 1970s, when Leo Estrada was working at the U.S. Census Bureau. Vargas calls the controversial proposal to require undocumented immigrants to identify themselves a scare tactic, aimed at decreasing representation in Washington. He details other challenges ahead, and what must be done to overcome them.

Demography & Population Studies as a Conduit to Systems Change

Quality data is paramount to ensuring equal representation. If we don’t know who is living in our communities, we can’t create and maintain the systems needed to care for and support those communities. In this panel discussion, experts on data collection, Chicano studies and urban planning discuss the challenges of getting good data, and how to turn data into action.

The Historical Exclusion of Minority Elected Officials & The Modern Fight for Minority-Majority Districts

Leo Estrada had a major impact on redistricting in California. This panel discussion features former elected officials, legal and political experts discussing how Estrada worked to ensure people of color achieved equal representation in the legislature. Not only was his expertise and data collection essential in understanding the makeup of California communities, but it also proved invaluable in recruiting the best candidates.

Mentorship: Building a Diverse Pipeline in the Academy

Leo Estrada’s legacy lives on in the scores of people he mentored over his decades-long career. This panel of academics, who crossed paths with Estrada at various points in their lives, discusses the lessons learned from his unique form of mentorship. They explain how making it in academia can be especially difficult for people from underrepresented communities, and how Estrada’s methods could be used to get more students from those communities through higher education.

Watch — The New Majority & the 2020 Census: Shifting the Balance of Power

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Hilda Solis and the Value of Higher Education

Hilda Solis was the first Latina to serve as Secretary of Labor and that is just one of her many “firsts.”

She was the first member in her family to go to college, earning degrees from California State Polytechnic University and University of Southern California. She was the first Latina elected into the California State Senate in 1994 and was re-elected in 1998. Solis was the first Latina to become a member of the Energy and Commerce Committee in congress and her nomination as Secretary of Labor made her the first Latina to serve in the U.S. cabinet.

Solis’ triumph for Latin’s across the nation made her an ideal candidate to speak at this Helen Edison Lecture in honor of Cesar Chavez at UC San Diego. In “A Look at What Cesar Chavez Symbolizes in the 21st Century with Hilda Solis,” Solis discusses the importance of higher education in the creation of a diverse and skilled workforce.

Click here for more videos of Helen Edison Lectures and don’t forget to check out our other videos on Economy and Labor Issues.

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The Real History of Cinco de Mayo

Before you crack open that Corona or dip that tortilla chip in some tasty guacamole, maybe it’s time you understood what Cinco de Mayo is really all about.

Why is it that a holiday commemorating an 1862 Mexican victory over the French at Puebla is so widely celebrated in California and across the United States, when it’s scarcely observed in Mexico?

In this episode of UCLA’s SubtextDavid E. Hayes-Bautista, Professor of Medicine and Director of the Center for the Study of Latino Health and Culture at UCLA, sheds some light on the origins of this annual celebration, revealing that the holiday is not Mexican at all, but rather an American one created by Latinos in California during the mid-nineteenth century.

The truth may not change your May 5th party plans, but at least you’ll know what you’re celebrating!

Watch “The History of Cinco de Mayo,” online now.

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UCTV Prime Vote: As Latinos Go, So Goes the Nation

 

UC Berkeley's Lisa Garcia Bedolla about to tape her UCTV Prime Vote commentary on the Latino vote.

We’ve got pundits, too!  Next up on UCTV Prime Vote is UC Berkeley’s Lisa Garcia Bedolla with As Latinos Go, So Goes the Nation, in which she argues that Republicans will never become a majority party without support from Latinos.

Professor Bedolla joins faculty from throughout the UC system who present their views on issues relevant to the next election.

Got five minutes to watch some thoughtful, research-based commentary without all the partisan shouting?  Check out the UCTV Prime Vote website. Then let us know what you think with a comment on the website, YouTube channel or Facebook page.

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Cesar Chavez and the Community Service Organization

Tomorrow is a holiday in the State of California. While some of us may have the day off, work will be at the top of our minds as we honor Latino labor leader and civil rights activist Cesar E. Chavez, who was born on March 31, 1927.

Chavez is an inspirational figure to so many — especially here in California, where he co-founded the organization that would become the United Farm Workers (UFW). But what inspired him to transition from farm worker to labor organizer?

Using archival footage, oral history interviews and more, the documentary “Organize! The Lessons of the Community Service Organization” looks at the pivotal grassroots effort launched in the 1940’s that empowered a generation of Mexican-Americans, including Chavez. Poor immigrants were able to move into the mainstream of American society through voter registration drives, lawsuits and legislative campaigns. Over 50 years later, the leaders of the movement reflect on the impact.

Take this opportunity to host your own Cesar Chavez Day celebration by watching the documentary. You might also want to browse around the Cesar Chavez learning resources put together by the California Departement of Education.

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