Tag Archives: Music

UC San Diego Jazz Camp

8232Since its inception 15 years ago, UC San Diego Jazz Camp has stayed focused on a single goal: ensuring the continued vitality of jazz music by identifying, instructing, and nurturing new talent. The camp accepts students ranging in age from 14 to adult, and from a variety of educational or vocational backgrounds. Prior to attending the camp, students attend placement auditions based upon which they are assigned to one of two proficiency levels, intermediate and advanced. Most of the camp’s instruction is designed for one of these levels.

The camp’s faculty is made up of internationally renowned musicians who are experts in a variety of jazz stylings, from be-bop to contemporary open-form. The rigorous and immersive curriculum covers a broad range of topics and techniques, including Jazz Improvisation, Listening to Jazz, Master Classes, and individual lessons. There is a particular emphasis on jazz as a performance-oriented art form through participation in small ensembles and informal jam sessions, and attendance at faculty concerts.

The week’s activities culminate in a finale concert in which all students perform as a member of an ensemble under the supervision of a faculty member. Concert sets feature an assortment of instrumental combinations and an eclectic repertoire that includes standards as well as new compositions by faculty and students. Each student gains valuable performance experience and an opportunity to shine in front of a supportive and appreciative audience. In turn, audience members have the opportunity to witness some fine young musicians at the start of their career and older musicians embarking on a new chapter.

Watch UC San Diego Jazz Camp 2017 and explore the archive.

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The Art of Nature

8232Renowned musician Steven Schick and award-winning environmentalist/author Barry Lopez may seem like an unlikely pairing until you consider the long history of nature’s influence on art, including music. From Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons” through Beethoven’s “Pastoral” Symphony and Debussy’s “La Mer” to the works of Vaughan Williams, Olivier Messiaen, and John Cage (to name but a few), contemplation of the natural environment has provided inspiration to generations of composers.

In Music and Nature, musician Schick and environmentalist Lopez consider the myriad ways our shared natural milieu has shaped the arts, and how the arts may in turn heighten awareness of environmental issues. They reference as an example John Luther Adams, a contemporary American composer whose works routinely incorporate natural sounds and/or allude to the environment. (His Pulitzer Prize-winning orchestral composition “Become Ocean” is based on the premise that if sea levels continue to rise, we will inevitably and quite literally “become ocean.”)

In the course of their talk the two men are able to cross the interstice that lays between their backgrounds – Schick’s as an Iowa farm boy and Lopez’s as the product of a New York upbringing – to find common ground in a philosophy that rejects an elitist or isolationist view of art, instead placing it firmly in the context of broader worldly concerns (e.g., climate change). This philosophy is reflected in the movement in educational circles from STEM – Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math – to STEAM, the previous disciplines combined with Art/Design. It also plays a role in the renewed recognition that a liberal arts education has advantages in today’s workplace.

An hour in the company of Steven Schick and Barry Lopez will stimulate ideas and conversations of your own – and that’s an hour well-spent.

Watch Music and Nature with Barry Lopez and Steve Schick

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Contributed by Arts & Humanities Producer, John Menier

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Liszt in the World

What do you know about Franz Liszt? You probably know he was a composer. You might know he was a piano virtuoso. What you may not know is that he was pretty much a rock star.

Although he didn’t play rock ‘n roll, Liszt went on massively successful tours, made all the money he could hope for, and even had groupies.

Liszt traveled the world playing thousands of concerts to screaming girls who fought over his velvet gloves, staying put for a few years here and there when he was having illegitimate children with Countess Marie d’Agoult or stealing Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein from her husband.

But Liszt wasn’t a stone cold fox entirely — much of the money he earned touring was donated to charities, churches and causes such as the Leipzig Musicians Pension Fund. At the end of his life, Liszt took the Franciscan order and quietly lived in a monastery.

Watch Liszt in the World, as UC San Diego Professor Emeritus Cecil Lytle explores the music and travels of this classical rock star.

For more videos of Liszt’s music, visit www.uctv.tv/liszt.

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What Is It That Makes Music Musical?

Everyone has a favorite song or beloved musical artist. But have you ever asked WHY you respond to music at all? What is it that makes music, well, musical?

That’s the question at the center of the fascinating six-part series “To Be Musical,” from UC San Diego’s Eleanor Roosevelt College. Join professors of music, literature and psychology as they decode the mysteries of music and its effect on our brains, our emotions and our lives. You’ll never tap your toes to your favorite song the same way again.

Browse the episodes at the “To Be Musical” series page or find them all below.

On the Bridge: The Beginnings of Contemporary Percussion Music with Steven Schick


How the West Rejected “Nice” Music A Century Ago with Steven Cassedy

Why Music? with David Borgo


Craft and Tools in Late Beethoven with Aleck Karis


Utterance, Ritual, Expression: Why Singing Makes Us Human with Susan Narucki


Musical Illusions, Perfect Pitch and Other Curiosities with Diana Deutsch

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April 2013 Highlights

Featured This Month
Program Highlights
New to Video On-Demand

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FEATURED THIS MONTH

Visionary Business Leaders

From Amazon to Whole Foods — and everything in between — these new programs showcase the bright ideas and bold moves from today’s most creative business leaders.

Conscious Capitalism with John Mackey Co-founder and Co-CEO of Whole Foods Market

“The Age of Amazon” with Marc Onetto, Amazon.com

…. and more at our website.

Oh, To Be Musical…

Don’t miss this fascinating series examining exactly what it is that makes music, musical. Professors of music, literature and psychology decode the mysteries of music and its effect on our brains, our emotions and our lives. Presented by UC San Diego’s Eleanor Roosevelt College.

To Be Musical

Is the Human Mind Unique?

New from CARTA, scientists from different fields discuss cognitive abilities often regarded as unique to humans, including humor, morality, symbolism, creativity and preoccupation with theminds of others. They assess the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether they are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans.

Premiering April 8

Is the Human Mind Unique? — CARTA

Celebrate National Poetry Month with UCTV

American poet Billy Collins headlines our annual Spring fling with poetry! Celebrate April’s National Poetry Month by browsing through our amazing archive of readings featuring established and emerging poets from around the world.

Poetry Month on UCTV

…. and more at our website.


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS (PACIFIC TIMES)

 

All programs repeat throughout the month. Visit the Program Schedule on our web site for additional air dates and times.

Health & Medicine

Heart Matters: Physiology of the Body’s Powerhouse

MIND Institute: Current Research and Applications

Blood Vessels: Pathology of the Intravascular Highway

iPads as Assisitive Technology Tools

Heart: Pathology of the Malfunctioning Corazon

Creative Brains: Music, Art, and Emotion

Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection – Research on Aging

more >>

Science

Perspectives on Ocean Science Hits 10 Million Views! Find out why this long-running series is so popular with lifelong learners.

Genetics and Gray Whale Behavior

Global Climate Change and Emerging Infectious Disease with Stanley Maloy and Alan Sweedler

more >>

Public Affairs

Federalism at the Border: Immigration Policy and the States with Gabriel Chin

The Palestinian Minority in Israel: Between Coexisting and Conflict

Farming in the 21st Century: A Woman’s Perspective from South Africa

Transforming Conflict through Nonviolent Coalitions with Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee

My Forty Years at Berkeley with Harry Kreisler

Asia, the West and the Logic of One World with Kishore Mahbubani

more >>

Humanities

The Trials and Triumphs of Conrad Black

more >>

Education

Do Babies Matter? Gender and Family in the Ivory Tower

Stereotype Threat Up Close: See it, Fix it

more >>


New Online Videos and Podcasts

The Future of Light – Lighting the World (Ep. 4)

Tales from the Front Lines: Reporting from Iraq and Afghanistan

Follow Your Heart: Anatomy of the Cardiovascular System Part II

more videos and podcasts >>

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