Tag Archives: neuroscience

Is the Human Mind Unique?

There’s plenty that goes on in these heads of ours — sometimes more than we want or understand. But just how much does the way our minds work distinguish us from other species?

In the latest series from UC San Diego’s CARTA, scientists from different fields discuss the cognitive abilities that are often regarded as unique to humans, including humor, morality, symbolism, creativity and preoccupation with the minds of others. They assess the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether they are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans.

Watch “Is the Human Mind Unique?” and then tell that brain of yours to click on over to the CARTA video archive for more intriguing insights into what makes us human.

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UC and the BRAIN Initiative

Yesterday, President Barack Obama announced his plans to create a bold, $100 million public-private initiative to better understand the brain and the diseases that affect it. Appropriately called BRAIN (for Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies), the group brings together experts across private industry, academia and government agencies in the areas of neuroscience, neurotechnology and neuroscience.

You can bet a good portion of that research will take place within the University of California, where researchers are already deeply entrenched in unlocking the mysteries within the human brain. How do we know? Because many of these same researchers have shared their fascinating discoveries in autism, alzheimer’s, neurology, and mental health and psychiatry with UCTV viewers for years.

And it seems our viewers are always hungry for more. UCTV’s Human Brain iTunes feed consistently shows up in iTunesU’s Top 10 Collections and “What’s Hot” sections.

No doubt that President Obama’s endorsement will mean even more exciting discoveries — and UCTV programs — to come. In the meantime, subscribe to our Human Brain feed in iTunes and browse our archive of Neurology programs at our website. There’s plenty to keep your brain busy!

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Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life

Someone in America is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every 68 seconds. Is there a way to keep this disease at bay?

Dr. Gary Small, a professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, suggests there may be.

In “Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life,” Dr. Small examines the connection between lifestyle choices and susceptibility and offers physical and mental preventative strategies, including stress relief and cross-training your brain.

Get a jump on your brain betterment by watching it now online.

Also make sure to watch UCTV Prime’s original web series, “Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” featuring Dr. Small and his UCLA colleagues who’ve made some promising strides in their Alzheimer’s research.

Want more healthy aging help? Check out the other programs from UC San Diego’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging at our website.

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Alzheimer’s: The Long and Costly Goodbye

In the first episode of UCTV Prime’s new series “Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” top UCLA researchers offer a startling overview of just how much the country– and the world–will be affected in the coming years by the disease. With a diagnosis every 68 seconds and an annual cost of $1.2 trillion projected by 2050, finding a cure for Alzheimer’s is more important than ever.

The episode also offers an intimate look into the lives of several brave patients diagnosed with the disease and their loved ones charged with caring for them as their memory deteriorates. These disarmingly frank interviews, including conversations with Patti Davis, daughter of Ronald Reagan, and TV personality Leeza Gibbons, both of whom lost a parent to the disease, add a personal, even hopeful, dimension to the Alzheimer’s story.

Watch “Alzheimer’s Long and Costly Goodbye” and stay tuned September 25 for the premiere of part two, “Alzheimer’s Diagnosis & Clinical Trials.” In the meantime, check out the “Heartache & Hope” website for links to additional resources and information.

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Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic

As Baby Boomers become senior citizens, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are on track to reach epidemic proportions, with a new diagnosis every 68 seconds and an annual cost of $1.2 trillion projected by 2050, not to mention the psychological toll on family members caring for their loved ones.

Premiering September 18, UCTV Prime’s original series “Heartache and Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,”  reveals what it’s like for patients and families living with this devastating disease and how UCLA researchers are leading the charge to slow its progress and, eventually, find a cure.

With 50% of primary caregivers for Alzheimer’s patients at risk of severe clinical depression, UCLA is working with local organizations and community leaders to establish caregiver support groups and connect caregivers to community resource centers. “Heartache and Hope” profiles several, including one established by Patti Davis, daughter of President Ronald Reagan, and another by television personality Leeza Gibbons, who lost her mother to the disease. Both women are featured in the series.

Researchers at UCLA and beyond are moving fast to understand Alzheimer’s disease and develop effective treatments. “Heartache and Hope” includes interviews with top UCLA researchers and their patients involved in the latest clinical trials, some of which demonstrate promising results.

You won’t want to miss this powerful, three-part series premiering September 18 on UCTV Prime’s YouTube channel and website, with new episodes every Tuesday through October 2. In the meantime, watch the trailer and spread the word!

 

 

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