Tag Archives: SIRA

Osteoporosis Update 2017

8232How do you know if you may have Osteoporosis? Should you take calcium or vitamin D supplements? What are the best exercises to keep your bones strong? Find out in this new Stein Institute for Research on Aging program that presents the latest information on osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder that decreases bone density and strength and affects 1 in 3 women (1 in 5 men). Complications from related fractures cause more hospital time for women than many other diseases, including heart attack, stroke, and breast cancer.

According to Heather Hofflich, DO, FACE, Clinical Professor of Medicine, UC San Diego Health System, fractures related to osteoporosis are often a downward spiral, and it’s important to prevent them. If you’re over 50 and experience a fracture, it’s important to alert your primary care doctor to test for bone density to see if you are at risk.

Watch Osteoporosis Update 2017 to learn more about diagnosis, secondary causes, as well as treatment and prevention options.

Browse other programs from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging.

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Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection

Eating right takes on a whole new meaning once you watch “Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection” on UCTV.

In her helpful talk from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging at UC San DiegoVicky Newman, MS, RD, explains how the right balance of foods, part of an anti-inflammatory eating plan, can maximize your health and energy level.  Learn practical tips for controlling your weight, maintaining bone strength and reducing the risk of common chronic diseases associated with aging. You’ll also find out about foods that support the body’s immune and detoxification systems, how to maintain a healthy (and happy) gut, and how to balance your fats to support your health and well-being.

Watch “Living for Longevity: The Nutrition Connection,” online now. For even more valuable healthy aging tips and research updates, check out the Stein Institute’s video archive.

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