Tag Archives: social science

Ethics and Social Science

“We’re not just playing games in empty classrooms anymore,” says Scott Desposato, professor of political science at UC San Diego.

As the world of social science is increasingly reaching beyond the traditional college campus setting for their studies, new ethical questions are emerging. Sure, large amounts of data can be gathered in massive scale field experiments but are we neglecting the principles of informed consent? How should science and society work together to break new ground while pushing innovative thought forward? Explore these questions and more in this program.

Watch — Emerging Ethics Challenges for Experimental Social Science – Exploring Ethics

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Stereotype Threat Up Close: See It, Fix It

Stereotype threat is the experience of anxiety in a situation where a person has the potential to confirm a negative stereotype about his or her social group. In school, stereotype threat can cause underrepresented students to perform below their potential. It can cause them to focus less on learning and more on the worrisome prospect of performing poorly.

The sting of stereotype threat can be felt by anyone: male or female, black or white, Asian or Latino, young or old. But when the threat is chronic, it can contribute to enduring patterns of inequality in school and beyond.

What can be done to reverse the effects of stereotype threat?

Claude Steele, social psychologist and dean for the School of Education at Stanford University, illuminates the experience of stereotype threat and highlights the powerful ways we can diminish it and close the achievement gap between groups.

Watch “Stereotype Threat Up Close: See It, Fix It,” presented by the Sage Center for the Study of the Mind at UC Santa Barbara.

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Understand Your “Stuff”

Stuff: A Cluttered LifeWhy do Americans have so much stuff?  And how much is too much? At what point do the toys and objects that fill middle-class homes become overwhelming to the people who live in them?

UCTV Prime’s new series “A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance,” premiering today, tackles these questions in a most unusual way — through an anthropological lens. The 3-part mini documentary is based on the work of three UCLA social scientists who ventured inside the homes of 32 families to document and study their “stuff” and gain an understanding of how and why American families have so much of it.

We hear from the researchers, visit some of the cluttered homes and chat with one of the research subjects, who’s refreshingly honest about her family’s busy, somewhat messy lifestyle. The result is a stunning visual ethnography that reveals the material culture of dual-income, child-centered households.

Watch “Stuff — A Cluttered Life: Middle-Class Abundance (Ep. 1),” and make sure to subscribe to UCTV Prime’s YouTube channel so you don’t miss Episodes 2 and 3, premiering January 18 and 25.

 

 

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