Tag Archives: ucsf

A Life in Medicine

8232Healthcare has never been as important to peoples’ lives as it is today. Staggering advances in technology and science stand alongside major changes — and controversies — in policy and payment. In this new series, Dr. Robert Wachter, chair of UCSF’s Department of Medicine, bestselling author, and rated in 2015 by Modern Healthcare magazine as the most influential physician-executive in the U.S., interviews leading lights in medicine and healthcare.

In addition to finding out what’s happening now and where medicine is going, these individuals talk about the experiences that shaped their careers.

The first two programs are available now with more coming monthly to UCTV.

Dr. Kirsten Bibbins-Domingo
From self-described army brat to a renowned physician and scientist, Dr. Bibbins-Domingo is the immediate past-chair of the US Preventive Services Task Force. Find out how she balances the various demands on her time, including being a mom.

Dr. Lloyd “Holly” Smith
Dr. Smith came to San Francisco in 1964 and transformed UCSF into a world leader. His ability to steer that change is as much about management as medicine.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Inspiration and Expertise – Conversations with UCSF Authors

8232What makes a world-class physician or scientist decide to write a book for the wide world of readers? Where do they find the inspiration and the time? What do they hope to accomplish? How do the satisfactions of writing compare to practicing medicine or writing scholarly articles?

Six recently published UCSF authors tackle these questions and more in these fascinating interviews:

Life After the Diagnosis: Expert Advice on Living Well with Serious Illness for Patients and Caregivers

Patients and caregivers living well with serious illness

Ordinary Medicine: Extraordinary Treatments, Longer Lives and Where to Draw the Line
The potential overuse of medical care and when to say “enough”

The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age
The impact of technology and the digital revolution on health and health care

Sensing Light
The impact of AIDS in San Francisco through the eyes of three fictional doctors

Fake Silk: The Lethal History of Viscose Rayon
The consequences of hazardous manufacturing and poisonous materials on public health

Heightened Expectations: The Rise of the Human Growth Hormone Industry in America
The role of the pharmaceutical industry in creating a new disease, short stature, to sell new a medication.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Investigating Medical Mysteries

765Have you ever wanted to be a detective and solve mysteries, conundrums, and enigmas? UCSF Medical Mysteries, explains how physicians at UCSF are like detectives using their knowledge, deductive reasoning, and data gathering skills to diagnose strange illnesses, rare diseases, new infections and unexpected poisonings. Climb inside the mind of these medical detectives and see how it works – how they obtain clues, synthesize data to formulate a hypothesis, and select and interpret their tests based on these hypotheses.

25800The discipline and practice of medicine has a very unique way of approaching problems. Doctors use a mix of experience, intuition, evidence, and even chance to inform their clinical conclusions and decisions. In the emergency room, these decisions are being made rapidly, often with tremendous amounts of uncertainty when a lot is on the line. In Inside the Mind of a Medical Detective, Dr. Jahan Fahimi explores the basis for those decisions, highlighting the sophisticated mechanisms that help doctors get it right, as well as the pitfalls and distractions that lead them astray.

25799The series kicks off with Genetic Mysteries: FOP – When Bodies Turn to Bone, which spotlights Dr. Joseph A. Kitterman, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics at UCSF. Dr. Kitterman explores Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP), a rare horrific genetic condition with an incidence rate of 1 in 2 million. In FOP, skeletal muscle, tendons, and ligaments undergo endochondral ossification in episodes known as flare-ups that lead to progressive permanent loss of range motion in joints.

Most people with FOP are initially given erroneous diagnoses, often leading to inappropriate treatment with permanent complications. Currently, there is no effective treatment, but recent research suggests there will be a clinical trial of treatment in the relatively near future.

Look out for more medical mysteries here. >> UCSF Medical Mysteries

Join the conversation on FaceBook and Twitter, @UCTelevision, #medicalmysteries, #FOP

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Foundations for Future Health Care Providers: Pharmacology

Have you always dreamed about being a doctor? Maybe you find the way the body works really fascinating or you feel compelled to help others.

Well, we’ve got a series for you! Foundations for Future Health Care Providers gives you a sneak peek at your first year at medical school with these videos from faculty at UCSF.

Medical school can be tough, but you can get ahead of the curve with these programs designed to teach you the fundamental concepts of medicine including the basics of anatomy, physiology, and pathology.

In “Pharmacology: Bugs and Drugs, Part 1,” Marieke Kruidering Hall, Associate Professor in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology at UCSF, talks about the diminished effectiveness of antibiotics as infectious bacteria become increasingly resistant to them.

One cause may be that people don’t always finish all of the prescribed drug — they feel better and don’t think they need to keep taking the antibiotic. Although the symptoms of the infection are gone, some bacteria remain and by not completing that antibiotic, people allow those remaining bacteria to survive. Those remaining bacteria multiply, thereby creating a strain of bacteria that is able to survive the treatment of antibiotics.

See what else Kruidering Hall has to say about the way antiviral, antimicrobial, and antifungal drugs work differently within the body, in “Pharmacology: Bugs and Drugs, Part 1.”

Explore other videos in the Foundations for Future Health Care Providers series!

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Foundations for Future Health Care Providers: Immunology 101

As much as we try to improve our health with exercise, a balanced diet, and good hygiene, our well being is largely determined by the immune system.

Learn about this complex coordination of organs from immunology expert, Katherine Gundling, MD, Associate Clinical Professor of Allergy and Immunology at UCSF, and Practice Chief of the Allergy/Immunology clinic at Moffitt Hospital.

She explains that our immune system is responsible for combating external threats, like viruses or physical injuries, and internal threats, such as cancer. But, before our immune system can protect us from these threats, it must regulate functions within the body to determine whether such entrants and occurrences are friend or foe.

Sometimes our immune systems make mistakes and react negatively to things that aren’t really so harmful, such as cat dander, causing allergies. But more severe dysfunctions of the immune system, like a primary immune disorder, can have more devastating effects. Watch “Immunology 101: The Basics and Introduction to our Patient” to meet Elizabeth, a patient with a primary immune disorder, and see how this disorder can teach us about the way a healthy immune system functions.

See what else you can learn about the body in this new UCSF Osher Mini Medical School series, Foundations for Future Health Care Providers .

facebooktwittergoogle_plus