Category: Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series

  • Little Blue Penguins Find New Home at Birch Aquarium

    They are known for their big personalities and rather small stature. Standing less than 12 inches tall and weighing around 2 pounds, Little Blue Penguins are the smallest species of the flightless bird. While the population of Little Blues is considered stable in most locations, declines have been observed in some areas. While in the […]

  • The Story Behind the Elusive Pacific Footballfish

    It looks like something out of a science fiction movie. A black blob with nightmarish spiny teeth, small black eyes, and prickly skin. A monster that never sees the light of day, using a bio-luminescent bulb swinging from its head to not only light its path, but also attract prey as well. The Pacific Footballfish […]

  • Bracing for Fire When the Wind Blows

    As recent events have shown, strong winds can spell disaster, even without the presence of fire. But when a fire does occur, the ALERTWildfire camera network deployed across the region provides rapid confirmation of emergency wildfire 911 calls, situational awareness, and in the worst-case scenarios, real-time data to help sequence evacuations. ALERTWildfire is a consortium […]

  • From Sea to Pharmacy

    The vastness of the ocean is only surpassed by the biodiversity within it; from familiar and unfamiliar mega-fauna, to every microbe and virus inhabiting every corner of the seas – from the deep freeze of the Antarctic to the scorching plumes of volcanic seafloor vents. Paul Jensen describes how he and other researchers are tapping […]

  • Understanding the Arctic Climate System

    The Arctic is changing rapidly in response to global climate and economic activity and yet much of it remains unexplored with modern scientific techniques. Jeff Bowman is a biological oceanographer who studies marine microbial communities. In this presentation at the Birch Aquarium at Scripps Institution of Oceanography he describes his group’s work in the Arctic […]

  • Glaciers and Sea Level Rise

    Using helicopters, icebreakers, fishing vessels, and autonomous surface and underwater vehicles for over a decade, Fiammetta Straneo and her group have been probing the edge of massive calving glaciers in iceberg-choked fjords in Greenland to explore what is the Achille’s heel of glaciers – the marine edge where glaciers meet the sea. Their goal? Collapsing […]

  • California Seaweed

    Kelp cutters once harvested tons of the nearshore kelp off the San Diego County coastline, producing additives for your ice cream, beer and pharmaceuticals. And of course, anyone who has had a California Roll or a bowl of miso soup is familiar with the centuries-old use of Nori. But now Scripps researchers are working to […]

  • Eavesdropping on Whales

    Since ancient seafarers first heard the strange calls of whales, humans have been fascinated by their meaning – from Flipper’s clicks and trills to the long serenades of Humpbacks. Inhabiting the dark ocean depths, whales use sound in many different ways – from feeding to navigating to finding friends and family. Join postdoctoral scholar Goldie […]

  • Lakes Beneath Antarctic Ice: Deep, Dark and Mysterious

    Where is one of the last places on earth you would expect to find a never-before known lake? Certainly, any of earth’s best-known deserts…the Sahara, Gobi, or Kalahari right? Technically fitting the definition of a desert by standards of precipitation, Antarctica could also be on that well-known list of dry places. But Antarctica has been […]

  • From Stone Bowls to Unsuspected Superheroes

    If rocks could talk – what could they tell us about the earth, history and maybe ourselves? Find out as collections manager Alex Hangsterfer and curator Richard Norris reveal the treasure trove of samples housed at Scripps. Hear some of the fascinating stories behind how these samples were collected and learn about the incredible variety […]