Tag Archives: AIDS

Preventing HIV By Understanding Patterns of Transmission

8232“Understanding the spread of infectious diseases in a population is the key to controlling them.”

AIDS is one of the most devastating infectious diseases in human history, and its cause, HIV, has been responsible for millions of infections. Every 9.5 minutes, someone in the U.S. is infected with HIV. It is estimated that there are over 56,000 new cases of HIV in the U.S. each year.

Dr. Susan Little of UC San Diego School of Medicine sheds some light on this disease and the possibility of preventing its spread. Her research tracks HIV infection by rapidly obtaining genetic information from those engaged in HIV healthcare. A discussion follows on privacy protections, the risks associated with the use of these data and their potential to significantly limit HIV transmission in communities. Dr. Little is presented by the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology in San Diego.

Watch Preventing HIV By Understanding Patterns of Transmission with Susan Little, MD.

Browse more programs from the Exploring Ethics Series.

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HIV – Is there a cure in sight?

HIV: Past, Present, & Future is the latest series from UCSF Osher Mini Medical School.

In this episode, HIV: Dare We Say Cure?, learn more about HIV treatment and the exciting potential for a cure in the near future. Dr. Peter Hunt breaks down the immunology of the disease, while Dr. Steven Deeks scrutinizes the possibility of achieving a cure for HIV in the near future. Watch as he explain case studies, including the Berlin Patient and the VISCONTI cohort, to determine how close we really are to developing a cure.

Taught by UCSF’s national and international leaders in HIV research, HIV: Past, Present, & Future presents the history of HIV/AIDS, how it was discovered, and how the epidemic continues to evolve worldwide. Watch all of the programs to gain a comprehensive, up-to-the-moment understanding of this complex disease and get a glimpse of what the future holds for a potential cure.

Be sure to check out other programs in the UCSF Osher Mini Medical School series!

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HIV: Past, Present, and Future

Humans have faced many epidemics, from the historical bubonic plague to diseases such as Malaria and Measles that still kill people today. But, none are quite like the virus that runs rampant through modern society: Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV.

Dr. Jay Levyan, a professor and AIDS and cancer researcher at UCSF, was one of the doctors involved in the discovery of the disease in the early 1980’s. In “HIV: A Primer,” Dr. Levyan explains some of the basic science behind the disease and what he thinks makes it so different from other epidemics. He says that HIV can interact with and infect a variety of different cells. Our vaccines are formulated to combat the free virus in the body, where medicines to combat HIV need to focus on treating the infected cell.

Dr. C. Bradley Hare, Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Medical Director, UCSF HIV/AIDS Division at San Francisco General Hospital gives a more personal look at HIV by examining individual cases of the disease in this most recent video of the HIV: Past, Present, and Future series, presented by UCSF Osher Mini Medical School.

Now that you’ve learned about the history of HIV, see what you know about the prevention of HIV and the future of the disease in this video, “HIV, Prevention and Global Health.”

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Hang-in and Have Smart Friends: The Road to HIV Resistance

With this week’s incredible news that doctors have cured an infant of HIV for the first time, optimism about the scientific community’s decades-long efforts to defeat HIV and AIDS has surged.

Roger Detels, UCLA Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology and Infectious Diseases, has been on the front lines since 1981, when he started a study of AIDS in young homosexual men in Los Angeles. In 1983, he formed a collaborative study with centers at three other institutions: Pittsburgh, Northwestern and Johns Hopkins. This study, known as the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study (MACS), is still going strong some 30 years later.

In his UCLA Faculty Research Lecture “Hang-in and Have Smart Friends: The Road to HIV Resistance,” Professor Detels shares the work of MACS and the process of studying — and preventing — HIV infections.

Check out more fascinating public talks from distinguished UCLA professors in a wide variety of fields at the UCLA Faculty Research Lecture series page.

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