Tag Archives: dementia

Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease, the most common cause of dementia among older adults, is currently ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

This series presented by leading clinicians and researchers from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center provides in-depth review of the neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, focusing primarily on Alzheimer’s disease. You’ll learn about the diverse clinical manifestations of Alzheimer’s, stages of illness, and current state of science regarding diagnosis, treatment and management of Alzheimer’s and other related diseases.

Early diagnosis can help preserve daily functioning for some time, even though the underlying disease process cannot be stopped or reversed.

Browse more programs in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Brain.

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Can we keep our brains fit?

8232As we grow older, we often become concerned about our memory. Dr. Ramin Motarjemi, Assistant Professor of Medicine and geriatrician at UCSD, discusses ways we can keep our brains sharp through all phases of life.

He recommends:

  • Managing your medical conditions and chronic diseases
  • Maintaining higher levels of physical and mental activity as well as social interaction

    He also looks at the current research on the effectiveness of:

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Taking vitamins and supplements
  • Using certain medications
  • Consuming alcohol (such as red wine)

    To learn more, including the warning signs of dementia, watch How to Keep Your Brain Fit, Boost Your Memory and Fight Dementia.

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  • Caring for the Caregiver: Fight Caregiver Stress and Prevent Burnout

    8232Caring for a loved one who is seriously ill is never easy. More than 80% of caregivers are either the spouse or child of the loved one they are caring for.

    Unfortunately, stress among caregivers is extremely common. Caregivers often try to do everything by themselves, which leaves them worn out. They are sometimes referred to as the “hidden patient” because they spend so much time caring for their loved one that they neglect their own health. If the stress of caregiving is left unchecked, it can take a toll on your health, relationships, and state of mind. The simple fact is that caregivers need care too.

    Brent T. Mausbach, PhD examines the role of the caregiver for dementia patients in this Stein Institute for Research on Aging presentation. Learn about the psychological, emotional, and physical consequences of caregiving and what can be done to mitigate their impact.

    Watch Caring for the Caregiver: Fight Caregiver Stress and Prevent Burnout.

    Browse more programs from the Sam and Rose Stein Institute on Aging.

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    Dementia in Society

    Dementia is a deterioration of cognitive function that begins with mild cognitive impairment, which appears just like forgetfulness, and eventually ends in death.

    There are many causes of the disease such as stroke, chronic alcohol abuse and Alzheimer’s but there is no way to reverse the damage of the brain’s degeneration.

    Dr. Mario D. Garrett of San Diego State University’s School of Social Work discusses the social impacts of dementia, such as the way dementia is classified by institutions and even the errors he has found in the way dementia is perceived.

    Watch “Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment – Research on Aging“ from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging to hear Garrett explain the revolution in dementia studies and the necessity for dementia victims to have social interaction.

    Watch this other video on Dementia with Dr. Berneet Kaur.

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    Alzheimer’s Patient and Caregiver Support

    It’s often said, “If you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s, then you’ve seen one person with Alzheimer’s.” The disease affects everyone differently, but all patients and their families experience some form of grief and fear, not to mention the stress put on the caregivers.

    In the third and final installment of UCTV Prime’s series “Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” UCLA researchers and clinicians offer up new models for healthcare and caregiver support that emphasize early diagnosis and support networks for everyone touched by the disease, including Patti Davis, daughter of Ronald Reagan, and TV personality Leeza Gibbons, who lost her mother to Alzheimer’s.

    Watch “Alzheimer’s Patient and Caregiver Support – Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic (Ep. 3),” only on UCTV Prime.

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