Category Archives: Economy

Severe Climate Change, Politics and the Economy

25778Rapidly melting arctic ice, catastrophic hurricanes, devastating wildfires, and record-breaking drought; scientists agree that the climate is changing, that it’s human caused, and that it will undeniably be one of the most serious problems facing the world’s citizens for generations to come. They acknowledge that technologies to combat climate change do exist. How can we come together to address this challenge which has become a partisan political issue in the United States in a way it has not elsewhere in the world? In a lively and timely conversation, internationally recognized energy policy expert UC Berkeley Professor Dan Kammen, joins business leader and investor Tom Steyer, to discuss the pressing issue of the ever-changing environment. Climate Change, Politics and the Economy: Rhetoric v. Reality looks at where we are now, the solutions at hand, the barriers we face, and what must happen to “overcome the partisan divide” to speed the transition to a sustainable planet. For more programs, visit UC Berekley’s Goldman School of Public Policy series. 

25778 From the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB, get the highlights of recent findings from the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment. Severe Weather in the U.S. Under a Changing Climate follows University of Illinois Professor of Atmospheric Science, Don Wuebbles, as he explains the international 50-year rise in extreme weather, especially in heat waves and large precipitation events (i.e. hail, rain, freezing rain, sleet, and snow). Research indicates that there will continue to be an increase in both droughts and floods in various parts of the U.S in the next century.

For more programs, visit UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy series page.

Join the conversation: @UCTelevision, #climatechange 

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How Hot Will It Get?

As this scorching summer winds down, take some time to reflect on the extreme heat of these past few summers, with 2010 and 2012 contending to be the first and third the hottest summers on record in the U.S., respectively.

It’s hard to argue against global warming in the midst of a heatwave, but how directly does this extreme weather correlate to our carbon consumption? And what does a rapidly warming planet mean for our future?

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Science at the Theater series includes presentations from climate scientists Bill Collins, Margaret Torn, Michael Wehner, and Jeff Chambers and UC Berkeley economist, Max Aufhammer, who discuss the pace and consequences of climate change.

Learn about the latest global warming projections from the experts in “How Hot Will It Get?.”

See what other cutting edge science videos are available in the Science at the Theater Series!

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Unwind George Packer’s “The Unwinding”

In this episode of Conversations with History, host Harry Kreisler welcomes George Packer, author of The Assassins’ Gate: America in Iraq, to discuss his new book, The Unwinding.

In this book, Packer interweaves the narratives of several different Americans, to paint the picture of a superpower coming undone at the seams. He tells the tale of an Evangelist son of tobacco farmers, a factory worker in a fading Rust Belt town, a silicon valley billionaire with radical ideas about the future and the internet, and a Washington insider torn between political ideals and greed; even Newt Gingrich and Jay-Z have a role in Packer’s book.

Hear Packer explain his ideas behind this image of the “new America” and how these lives give insight to the changing American dream in “The Unwinding with George Packer.” Get behind the story as George discusses forming his political identity and how he became the writer he is today.

Watch other authors who have visited UC Berkeley on Conversations with History.

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Start Me Up! Entrepreneurs at Career Boost Camp 2013

Entrepreneurship plays a vital role in the U.S. economy as it embodies the spirit of American capitalism.

However, as the necessity of capitalism dictates, some of these entrepreneurs must fail in order for others to succeed.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, survival rates of new start-ups have been dwindling since the recession began. The BLS reports, “The period from 1993 to 2006 was marked by an increase in the number of births and deaths [of start up companies], indicating a higher amount of business ‘churn’ — that is, new business establishments entered and old establishments exited the economy in greater numbers. Since the most recent recession began in December 2007, births have experienced the steepest decline in the history of the series.”

But even in this tough economy, UC San Diego Alumni have managed to create and sustain successful businesses. Watch “Start Me Up! Entrepreneurs at Career Boost Camp 2013” to hear from a chief creative officer, a computer and electrical engineer, and other entrepreneurs as they share their tales of successful start ups.

For more career advice and job-focused videos, check out The Career Channel.

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Revisiting the Rhetoric of the 2012 Presidential Debates

In the 2012 presidential campaign, both candidates repeatedly promised one thing: to deal with the economic and unemployment issues that plague the nation. Many voters were skeptical that the opposing candidate’s plan could really help Americans find work, which led to very heated debates on the matter.

Take a look inside the rhetoric of the 2012 campaign as UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy’s Dean, Henry E. Brady, joins UC Davis economist Hilary Hoynes and UC Berkeley sociologist Cybelle Fox to explore the way the candidates discussed income inequality.

Richard “Dick” Beahrs, a member of the Center on Civility & Democratic Engagement Advisory Board at the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, moderates the panel as they evaluate the way the debate strategies that each candidate used have affected bipartisanship, civility, and public discussion.

Watch “Makers v. Takers: A Sensible Way to Debate the Role of Government?” to see what you can determine about the two politicians’ use of words.

See what other videos are available from Goldman School of Public Policy.

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