Category: Health and Medicine

Women’s Health: A Critical Update Across the Lifespan

8232It seems obvious that men and women are different, biologically. But until the 20th century, serious women’s health research was largely neglected. It wasn’t until 1987 that the National Institutes of Health adopted guidelines to include women in clinical research.

Fortunately, things have changed.

In this new series from UC San Francisco’s Mini Medical School for the Public, you’ll discover the latest information about a woman’s unique health needs presented by UCSF faculty from the Women’s Health Center. Programs cover a wide spectrum of issues over the course of a woman’s life and address both comprehensive and integrative approaches to care.

Watch the following programs online now:

29273Every Patient is an Athlete: Using Exercise as Medicine
Dr. Carlin Senter is a primary care sports medicine doctor whose focus is to help patients of all ages stay active. She explores exercise and the athlete in every woman.

29274What’s New in Management of the Menopause?
Dr. Michael Policar, Professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences at UCSF School of Medicine, explores what’s new in the management of menopause. From tips for living with hot flashes to hormone treatment, see what works and what doesn’t.

29275Breast Cancer Screening and Prevention: A Clinician’s Perspective
About one in eight women will develop invasive breast cancer. Dr. Mindy Goldman, Director of the Women’s Cancer Care Program at UCSF, specializes in women’s health care and gynecology issues for breast cancer patients and those at risk for cancer. She presents a clinician’s perspective on screening and prevention of this all-too-common disease.

Stay tuned for these programs coming soon:

Outsmarting Stress One Breath at a Time

Breast Cancer in Marin: The Myths, The Facts & The Science

Not All Roads Point to Hysterectomy: Treatment Options for Fibroids

Browse all programs in Women’s Health: A Critical Update Across the Lifespan.

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Preventing HIV By Understanding Patterns of Transmission

8232“Understanding the spread of infectious diseases in a population is the key to controlling them.”

AIDS is one of the most devastating infectious diseases in human history, and its cause, HIV, has been responsible for millions of infections. Every 9.5 minutes, someone in the U.S. is infected with HIV. It is estimated that there are over 56,000 new cases of HIV in the U.S. each year.

Dr. Susan Little of UC San Diego School of Medicine sheds some light on this disease and the possibility of preventing its spread. Her research tracks HIV infection by rapidly obtaining genetic information from those engaged in HIV healthcare. A discussion follows on privacy protections, the risks associated with the use of these data and their potential to significantly limit HIV transmission in communities. Dr. Little is presented by the Center for Ethics in Science and Technology in San Diego.

Watch Preventing HIV By Understanding Patterns of Transmission with Susan Little, MD.

Browse more programs from the Exploring Ethics Series.

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Need more vitamin D? Step outside!

8232Our growing concern for skin cancer has given sunshine a bad name. New research on the benefits of sunshine – and vitamin D in particular – indicates that it’s time to make friends with the sun, once again.

You may know that vitamin D is necessary for Calcium absorption, but according to Dr. Robert P. Heaney of Creighton University, in the absence of adequate vitamin D, none of our body systems work well.

So what’s the best way to get enough? Good old fashioned sunshine. Vitamin D produced by sun exposure lasts 2-3 times longer in your body than a supplement.

But too much sun is still bad, right? Yes. You never want to burn. Excessive sun exposure can lead to skin cancer and premature aging (i.e. wrinkles). But too little can contribute to a host of medical problems including diabetes, certain types of cancer (yes!), hypertension, asthma, arthritis, and on and on.

The key is getting sun exposure in the proper “doses.” Dr. Michael F. Holick of Boston University Medical Center says that, ideally, we should be getting 5-15 minutes of sunshine on our arms and legs during the peak of the day, 2-3 times per week, followed by good sun protection.

Want to learn more about the science of vitamin D and sunshine? Then browse all of the videos in this new series, Vitamin D for Public Health, presented by GrassrootsHealth and the UC San Diego School of Medicine. Notable researchers discuss conditions affected by vitamin D, ways to improve patient outcomes, how to solve the deficiency epidemic and much more.

Then step outside for your daily dose of sunshine!

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The Kids are All Right – Adolescent Health Care

8232With middle-of-the night-feedings, toddler tantrums, and elementary school behind you it’s time to face the teen years when our children really grow into the people they will become.

Adolescence, the years from puberty to adulthood, is a time of change and intense growth – physically, emotionally and intellectually. UCSF’s Mini Medical School for the Public takes you on a journey through the teen topics of eating behavior (including obesity), smoking and substance use, adolescent development, sexual activity, depression and bullying, chronic disease, and includes an update on health care policy concerning adolescents. Come and learn from the world’s foremost physicians and researchers in their various fields of expertise concerning the younger population!

28886Adolescent Depression and Anxiety with Josephine Lau, MD
Why are mental health disorders more prevalent during adolescence? Dr. Josephine Lau, UCSF Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, looks at symptoms, prevalence and treatment of adolescent depression and anxiety.

28887How to Talk to Teens: A Developmental Approach with Carolyn Bradner Jasik, MD
Dr. Carolyn Bradner Jasik describes trends in adolescent risk‐taking behavior and the impact on health. She reviews typical adolescent development and highlights research on the developing brain, and the important role of risk taking in brain remodeling.

28888Maximizing Health Care for Underserved and Marginalized Youth with Marissa Raymond-Flesch, MD
Dr. Marissa Raymond-Flesch, UCSF Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, focuses her research on access to care for adolescents and young adults with a particular interest in improving reproductive health access for minority and border communities.

28906Eating Disorders Part 1: How to Prevent, Identify, and Intervene Early with Sara Buckelew, MD, MPH
Research shows that early detection and prompt intervention may prevent as many as two‐thirds of patients from developing a more serious eating disorder. Dr. Sara Buckelew discusses how to identify an eating disorder, early intervention and prevention.

And coming soon:

Eating Disorders Part 2: Recent Advances in Treatment with Daniel Le Grange, PhD
UCSF’s Daniel Le Grange looks at the prevalence and mortality of eating disorders. He discusses inpatient and outpatient treatment and the role of the family.

Contraceptive Choices for Teens and Young Adults: Treatment of Menstrual Issues In Addition to Birth Control with Loris Hwang, MD
Dr. Loris Hwang, UCSF Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine, looks at what to consider in choosing a contraceptive method for a teen or young adult. She explains what medical conditions are treated using hormonal contraception and which methods are most effective.

Watch all of the programs in The Kids Are All Right: Adolescent Health Care.

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Find the Right Path to Your Medical Career

8232Approaches to a successful career in medicine can be many and varied.

UC San Diego Extension’s Post-Baccalaureate Premedical Program is one such avenue highlighted in The Persistence Factor: Alternative Pathways to Your Medical Career. This informative panel discussion features four experts in medical education as well as a recent graduate of this exciting new program.

Geared toward students and working professionals who, for whatever reason, missed out on the most direct route to medical school admission, The Persistence Factor gives viewers insights into what the medical school experience is really like and offers the all-important advice on how to get there.

Watch The Persistence Factor: Alternative Pathways to Your Medical Career.

Browse other programs on The Career Channel.

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