Category Archives: Health and Medicine

New Series Explores the Spread of HIV in Tijuana

8232Every once in awhile, we work on a project that touches our soul. Such is the case of HIV/SIDA, a four-part series that brought us in contact with people whose paths we otherwise would not have crossed.

In the two years of field reporting, we saw many acts of kindness — the glamorous physician who washes the feet of Tijuana’s poor, the compassionate medical student who worries about a sex worker’s UTI, the transgender woman who overcomes her fear of mockery and reveals her HIV status, the ex-heroin addict who walks the Tijuana River Canal, urging residents to protect themselves by using clean needles, and the Tijuana cop who is teaching his fellow police officers to see addiction as a sickness, not a crime. These are among many featured in this series HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana.

We’ll show you what UC San Diego researchers and others are doing to stop the spread of HIV and how those most affected by the epidemic are coping under difficult conditions. And, we’ll share some of our favorite moments of empathy, moments of hope for humanity, the kind that stick with you, long after the reporting is done.

Watch HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana.

Submitted by Shannon Bradley, UCTV Producer of HIV/SIDA: The Epidemic in Tijuana


1 in Every 4 Deaths in the U.S. is Due to Heart Disease

8232Cardiovascular disease is the nation’s leading cause of death. People of all ages and backgrounds can get the condition. Fortunately, the last two decades have witnessed incredible advances in our understanding and treatment of heart disease. This new series will help you get current on developments in diagnoses, treatment and prevention with UC San Francisco cardiologists.

Learn more about the advances in preventive cardiology focusing on the role of genetics, diet, exercise, cholesterol, life style changes and integrative care.

Preventive Cardiology
Genetics for Preventive Cardiology

Get current on drug and device treatments as well cardiac transplantation. Find out about the latest advances in the treatment of patients with heart attacks as well as the remarkable advances in non-open chest repair of heart valves.

Replacing Heart Valves Without Open Cardiac Surgery
Rhythms Of The Heart

Discover the causes and treatment options for patients with cardiac rhythm abnormalities such as use of ablation for cure of common rhythm disturbances including Atrial Fibrillation.

Arterial Fibrillation for the Interested Layperson
Sudden Cardiac Death
Examining Heart Failure: How To Recognize And Treat The Weak Heart

Cardiovascular diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Find out what everybody ought to know about this all too common disease.

Browse more programs in Cardiology.


Can we keep our brains fit?

8232As we grow older, we often become concerned about our memory. Dr. Ramin Motarjemi, Assistant Professor of Medicine and geriatrician at UCSD, discusses ways we can keep our brains sharp through all phases of life.

He recommends:

  • Managing your medical conditions and chronic diseases
  • Maintaining higher levels of physical and mental activity as well as social interaction

    He also looks at the current research on the effectiveness of:

  • Eating a healthy diet
  • Taking vitamins and supplements
  • Using certain medications
  • Consuming alcohol (such as red wine)

    To learn more, including the warning signs of dementia, watch How to Keep Your Brain Fit, Boost Your Memory and Fight Dementia.

  • Caring for the Caregiver: Fight Caregiver Stress and Prevent Burnout

    8232Caring for a loved one who is seriously ill is never easy. More than 80% of caregivers are either the spouse or child of the loved one they are caring for.

    Unfortunately, stress among caregivers is extremely common. Caregivers often try to do everything by themselves, which leaves them worn out. They are sometimes referred to as the “hidden patient” because they spend so much time caring for their loved one that they neglect their own health. If the stress of caregiving is left unchecked, it can take a toll on your health, relationships, and state of mind. The simple fact is that caregivers need care too.

    Brent T. Mausbach, PhD examines the role of the caregiver for dementia patients in this Stein Institute for Research on Aging presentation. Learn about the psychological, emotional, and physical consequences of caregiving and what can be done to mitigate their impact.

    Watch Caring for the Caregiver: Fight Caregiver Stress and Prevent Burnout.

    Browse more programs from the Sam and Rose Stein Institute on Aging.


    Palliative Care: Live Better, Longer

    Palliative care focuses on improving your quality of life by managing pain and other stressful symptoms of a serious illness. Unlike hospice care, reserved for people who likely have 6 months or less to live and are unlikely to be cured, palliative care is for people of any age, and at any stage in illness, whether that illness is curable, chronic, or life threatening.

    In this series, “Palliative Care: Living as Well as Possible for as Long as Possible,” you’ll explore key issues in the experience of serious illness, learn what Palliative Care is and how to improve care for the patient and family, and what it can offer to help people achieve the best possible quality of life for as long as possible regardless of their illness.

    Latest programs:

    Palliative Care: Who is it For, What Does it Do, Why Should I Want it and When?
    Serious illness and end of life care has changed. People live longer and death often comes after years of serious, chronic illness. Dr. Steven Pantilat, UCSF Professor of Medicine, explains that the challenge is to help people achieve the best possible quality of life for as long as possible, consistent with their goals and preferences.

    Giving Your Loved Ones the Gift of Knowing What You Want: Advance Care Planning
    Dr. Rebecca Sudore, Associate Professor of Medicine at UCSF, explains that the goal of advanced care planning is to make sure that the medical care a person gets is the medical care that is in line with her or his life goals and values and to prepare people and their loved ones to make informed choices based on what is most important.

    Are There Atheists in a Foxhole?: The Spiritual Dimension Of Illness
    Rev. Denah Joseph, Chaplain and Associate Director UCSF Palliative Care Service, reflects on the domains of religion, spirituality, and culture in the care of the seriously ill.

    Browse all programs in Palliative Care: Living as Well as Possible for as Long as Possible.