Category Archives: Health and Medicine

Guns, Obesity, and Opioids

They may not seem related, but Dr. Sandro Galea, Dean of the Boston University School of Public Health, says we can approach guns, obesity and opioids in the same manner: population health. Dr. Galea breaks down the key concepts of population health – a relatively new field – during the inaugural Colloquium on Population Health and Health Equity at the UCSF School of Medicine.

Dr. Galea argues guns, obesity and opioids are the three epidemics of our time, and three of the main reasons life expectancy is declining in the United States. They also share three key characteristics: They are important, costly health concerns. They are complex. They are resistant to simple solutions. The key to overcoming these challenges Dr. Galea says, is using the population health approach.

He lists nine principles of population health, but focuses on four, including the concept that small changes in ubiquitous causes of health problems can have a greater impact than big changes to rare causes. Dr. Galea uses the example that while much has been done to curb the overprescription of opioids, the epidemic continues to grow. That’s because other options, like synthetic opioids, have become more widely available. Dr. Galea says that’s where population health comes in – finding ways to improve health on a large scale, and addressing epidemics from every angle.

Watch Guns, Obesity, and Opioids: A Population Health Science Approach to Contemporary Concerns

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Aging Well

Evidence is building for the importance of physical and social activity as the way to optimize wellbeing in older age. UCSF Geriatrics faculty review their research and cutting-edge work on improving physical, social and emotional wellbeing in older adults.

Explore topics on the myths of aging, improving surgical outcomes, the science of longevity, social connection in older adults, and tools for comprehensive advance care planning.

If you are an older adult, caregiver or anyone interested in optimizing well-being as you get older, this is for you.

Browse more programs in Aging, Activity, and Community: The Science Behind Function and Social Connections in Older Age

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Oh, Our Aging Bones

Starting at about 30 years old, the density of bones begins to decline. As a result, bones become more fragile and are more likely to break. There are over seven million fractures in the United States every year. With a more physically active and increasingly aging population, we are seeing an increasing number of fractures in the elderly. Treatment of older patients, however, often requires different approaches than similar injuries in younger adults.

This series features orthopedists from UCSF who discuss common fractures in the elderly throughout the body: knee, ankle, spine, pelvis, wrist, elbow, shoulder and hip. They address common issues in bone injuries, how they are treated and what you can do to help prevent fractures.

Get an in-depth update as to what is being done to improve the care of geriatric patients with fractures.

Browse the series of programs in Aging Bones: Understanding Fractures, Healing, and Repair

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Why Diets Don’t Work, and What Does

Diets make bold claims: drop 15 pounds in four weeks! Shed that stubborn belly fat! Get the abs you’ve always wanted! But, for most people, diets just don’t work. In fact, studies show the vast majority of dieters who do lose weight end up right back where they started, or even heavier, after five years. Neuroscientists and science writers Sandra Aamodt and Darya Rose break down the road blocks to sustained weight loss, and how your own brain is sabotaging your success. Rose explains how you can skip the crash diets and create long-lasting changes through the science of forming new habits. Her step-by-step approach makes the daunting task of creating a healthier, happier you seem simple.

Watch The Diet Trap: Why You Should Never Go on a Diet Again, and What To Do Instead.

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Future Patient/Future Doctor

Larry Smarr is defining the future of healthcare. As he, a world-renowned computer scientist and Michael Kurisu, the much-in-demand osteopathic physician at UC San Diego demonstrate, the balance of power between patients and doctors will change as technology gives patients the tools to know more about their own bodies. And the more informed they become, the more likely they will work with their doctors to develop treatment and prevention plans that are appropriate for them. Using Smarr as a case study, this patient and doctor show the benefits of hands-on, systems-based thinking in treating sciatica and self-diagnosing Crohn’s disease. Kurisu then takes these concepts to Project Apollo, a group of highly educated and motivated patients who call themselves “Little Larry’s” as they use the same techniques to address and treat their own health problems. All of this pointing to what theologian and physician Albert Schweitzer envisioned in the last century, “the doctor of the future will be one self.” Smarr and Kurisu are showing us how.

Watch Future Patient/Future Doctor – Larry Smarr, PhD & Michael Kurisu, DO .

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