Category Archives: Public Policy Channel

New From the UC Public Policy Channel

Six new programs on the UC Public Policy Channel wrap up a productive year of smart talk from the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley. From economist Alan Auerbach, a deep dive into the impact of Trump’s tax cuts. From faculty members Elizabeth Linos and Amy Lerman, ideas on how governments can rebuild public trust. From Goldman graduate Annie Campbell Washington, a reflection on her rise to elected office in Oakland. From Jesús Guzmán, life as an undocumented student growing up in California. And finally, from Dean Henry E. Brady, inspiring words to his graduates on being true to their convictions, even when challenged by their institutions, in this stirring 2018 Commencement address. All essential summer viewing for informed citizens preparing to vote in the November midterms.

From Individual to the Nation: The New Tax Plan’s Impact with Alan Auerbach

Making Governments Work with Elizabeth Linos — In the Living Room with Henry E. Brady

The Government’s Reputation Crisis with Amy Lerman — In the Living Room with Henry E. Brady

Serving Oakland with Annie Campbell Washington — In the Living Room with Henry E. Brady

Jesús Guzmán — Featured Student Speaker at the Goldman School of Public Policy Board of Advisors Dinner Spring 2018

Goldman School of Public Policy Commencement 2018

Browse more programs in The UC Public Policy Channel.

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What Working Class Voters are Thinking

32822This is one of those rare political discussions where two people with different points of view actually listen and learn from each other as each describes their interpretation of why the majority of working-class voters sided with Donald Trump in the last election. Sociologist Arlie Hochschild and political scientist Steven Hayward discuss the causes for the ongoing cultural divide and offer glimmers of hope as they highlight examples of where people of opposite views have found common ground.

Watch: The 2016 Election: What Working Class Voters Are Thinking with Arlie Hochschild and Steven Hayward

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Are Robots Going to Hurt or Help? Let’s Talk Driverless Cars with Jennifer Granholm

8232Imagine a not-too-distant future where gasoline-powered engines disappear and we all travel in electric, driverless cars that don’t pollute the air. And, a future where the actual number of cars on the road decreases because we’ll all participate in a transportation sharing service rather than owning our own vehicles. That’s the vision presented by former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm in this energetic talk to the Goldman School of Public Policy as she describes its financial and environmental advantages but also outlines the new policy challenges. Among them, how to retrain professional drivers? What to do with empty parking lots? And how to replace the tax revenue generated by gas sales? Granholm’s eye-opening peek into the next decade will give you lots to think about next time you’re stuck in traffic.

Watch now: Are Robots Going to Hurt or Help? Let’s Talk Driverless Cars with Jennifer Granholm

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Preparing For Life After Incarceration

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“The first 72 hours of freedom, says Nicholas Alexander of the Reentry Success Center are the most fraught with danger. Without a job or a place to live, newly released inmates are at high risk for finding trouble. That’s a situation that Alexander and his colleagues in Richmond, CA are working hard to prevent. They reach out to prisoners and their families before and after the release to provide critical services — like housing, employment training, and counseling — to help them reintegrate successfully into their communities. And, as Alexander tells Jonathan Stein on this edition of In the Arena, it’s working! Hear how better futures are being built on Preparing for Life After Incarceration with Nicholas Alexander on the UC Public Policy Channel.

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Protecting Women from Domestic Violence: In the Living Room with Sudha Shetty

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Smart thinking! That’s the reaction many had when Sudha Shetty told the story of how she reached women in Seattle’s South Asian community who may have been victims of abuse. As the then-head of Chaya, a domestic violence prevention program, Shetty tried to speak at numerous public events in order to raise awareness of the issue. But after being rebuffed again and again, she figured out how to bypass the podium gatekeepers. She printed Chaya business cards listing resources for victims and placed them in the women’s bathrooms, thereby avoiding the scornful gaze of the male event organizers. Hear more about this and other ways Shetty is now helping women as the director of the Hague Domestic Violence Project and the assistant dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley.

Watch Protecting Women from Domestic Violence with Sudha Shetty — In the Living Room with Henry E. Brady

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