Tag Archives: uctv

The Brick People

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Bill Deverell, Director, Huntington USC Institute discusses the history of Simon’s Brick Yard #3, “It’s seen by many people as ironic that there is virtually nothing left there today, but in fact that’s fairly typical of Los Angeles having a sense of amnesia quality to its past, and an ineffable ability to cover up what once was, but when the Simon’s Brick Yard was roaring through the 20’s and even into the Great Depression period, it was seen to be the world’s largest brick yard.”

“The Brick People” chronicles the story and legacy of the first generation of Mexican immigrants who struggled to work at Simons Brickyard #3 in Los Angeles during the early part of the 20th century. The bricks they made literally and culturally laid the foundation for Los Angeles and the surrounding region.

Produced by UC Irvine professor Alejandro Morales, this documentary explores themes of immigration, discrimination and cultural foundry as told by former residents and historians of Simons, California.

Join the conversation @UCTelevision, #thebrickpeople

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Investigating Medical Mysteries

765Have you ever wanted to be a detective and solve mysteries, conundrums, and enigmas? UCSF Medical Mysteries, explains how physicians at UCSF are like detectives using their knowledge, deductive reasoning, and data gathering skills to diagnose strange illnesses, rare diseases, new infections and unexpected poisonings. Climb inside the mind of these medical detectives and see how it works – how they obtain clues, synthesize data to formulate a hypothesis, and select and interpret their tests based on these hypotheses.

25800The discipline and practice of medicine has a very unique way of approaching problems. Doctors use a mix of experience, intuition, evidence, and even chance to inform their clinical conclusions and decisions. In the emergency room, these decisions are being made rapidly, often with tremendous amounts of uncertainty when a lot is on the line. In Inside the Mind of a Medical Detective, Dr. Jahan Fahimi explores the basis for those decisions, highlighting the sophisticated mechanisms that help doctors get it right, as well as the pitfalls and distractions that lead them astray.

25799The series kicks off with Genetic Mysteries: FOP – When Bodies Turn to Bone, which spotlights Dr. Joseph A. Kitterman, Professor Emeritus of Pediatrics at UCSF. Dr. Kitterman explores Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva (FOP), a rare horrific genetic condition with an incidence rate of 1 in 2 million. In FOP, skeletal muscle, tendons, and ligaments undergo endochondral ossification in episodes known as flare-ups that lead to progressive permanent loss of range motion in joints.

Most people with FOP are initially given erroneous diagnoses, often leading to inappropriate treatment with permanent complications. Currently, there is no effective treatment, but recent research suggests there will be a clinical trial of treatment in the relatively near future.

Look out for more medical mysteries here. >> UCSF Medical Mysteries

Join the conversation on FaceBook and Twitter, @UCTelevision, #medicalmysteries, #FOP

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Severe Climate Change, Politics and the Economy

25778Rapidly melting arctic ice, catastrophic hurricanes, devastating wildfires, and record-breaking drought; scientists agree that the climate is changing, that it’s human caused, and that it will undeniably be one of the most serious problems facing the world’s citizens for generations to come. They acknowledge that technologies to combat climate change do exist. How can we come together to address this challenge which has become a partisan political issue in the United States in a way it has not elsewhere in the world? In a lively and timely conversation, internationally recognized energy policy expert UC Berkeley Professor Dan Kammen, joins business leader and investor Tom Steyer, to discuss the pressing issue of the ever-changing environment. Climate Change, Politics and the Economy: Rhetoric v. Reality looks at where we are now, the solutions at hand, the barriers we face, and what must happen to “overcome the partisan divide” to speed the transition to a sustainable planet. For more programs, visit UC Berekley’s Goldman School of Public Policy series. 

25778 From the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB, get the highlights of recent findings from the 2013 U.S. National Climate Assessment. Severe Weather in the U.S. Under a Changing Climate follows University of Illinois Professor of Atmospheric Science, Don Wuebbles, as he explains the international 50-year rise in extreme weather, especially in heat waves and large precipitation events (i.e. hail, rain, freezing rain, sleet, and snow). Research indicates that there will continue to be an increase in both droughts and floods in various parts of the U.S in the next century.

For more programs, visit UC Berkeley’s Goldman School of Public Policy series page.

Join the conversation: @UCTelevision, #climatechange 

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CARTA: Mind Reading: Human Origins and Theory of Mind

745The Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) brings together top researchers from around the world to explore and explain the origins of the human phenomenon. This fall at the Salk Institute, they gathered to discuss, Mind Reading: Human Origins and Theory of Mind. 

The phrase “Theory of Mind” (ToM) has historically referred to the ability to impute mental states to oneself and others, but has been used in a variety of ways during the 35 years since the original Premack and Woodruff paper (1978). The analysis of ToM has been the subject of many papers in developmental psychology and in anthropogeny, the latter focusing on differences in mental performance between humans versus other mammals and birds. Because precise definition is necessary for rigorous scientific analysis, the first talk will focus on what ToM is. The rest of the talks will cover the Ontogeny of Human ToM, relevant information on other mammals and birds, and the neuronal correlates and mechanisms of human ToM performance.

Excerpt from CARTA 

25934The symposium begins with the topic of human brain development: What is Theory of Mind?, Emergence of Theory of Mind in Human Babies, and The Social Brain in Adolescence. Ralph Adolphs, professor of psychology and neuroscience and professor of biology at Caltech, offers his working definition of Theory of Mind. Next, with a little help from a clip of  cult classic The Princess Bride, Jessica Sommerville of the University of Washington delves into the topic of Emergence of Theory of Mind in Human Babies. Lastly, Sarah-Jayne Blakemore of University College London goes over the hilariously awkward topic of The Social Brain in Adolescence.

25935In the next hour the focus shifts to animals; “Mind Reading” in Chimpanzees, Comparing Apes and Dogs, and Reflections of Dolphin and Elephant Minds. Tetsuro Matsuzawa of Kyoto University shares his extensive research on chimpanzees, including videos and a live demonstration of their “language.” He is followed by Comparing Apes and Dogs with Juliane Kaminski of the UK University of Portsmouth. Diana Reiss of Hunter College, CUNY wraps up the talk on other species with Reflections of Dolphin and Elephant Minds.

25936The symposium concludes by taking a closer look into our brains with, What Makes Humans Different?, Brain Imaging Studies, and Mirror Neurons and More. Elizabeth Spelke, professor of psychology at Harvard University argues that human’s combinatorial minds make us different from other species. Followed by fellow Harvard professor, Jason Mitchell, and his research on Brain Imaging Studies. Michael Arbib of the University of Southern California ends the day on the notion that Mirror Neurons and More give us the ability to “put oneself in the other’s shoes.”

Airing on UCTV April 2014; CARTA will host Birth to Grandmotherhood: Childrearing in Human Evolution at UC San Diego.

Head to www.ucsd.tv/carta for a full list of CARTA programs.

Join the conversation @UCTelevision, @salkinstitute, #CARTA

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UC Santa Barbara Summit on Energy Efficiency 2013

544Over the summer the UC Santa Barbara Institute for Energy Efficiency hosted the 4th consecutive year of The UC Santa Barbara Summit on Energy Efficiency. This year focused on Materials for a Sustainable Energy Future, including topics such as; Connecting Innovation: The Utilities’ Perspective, Electrochemical Energy Storage Technologies, The Challenge of Electrical Energy Storage, Energy Efficient Information & Communications Technology, Innovations in Solid State Lighting, and Critical Materials for Energy Technologies. Over 200 attendees joined together to hear from leaders from industry, academia, national labs and government to discuss materials challenges, opportunities and the latest developments relating to key technologies impacting energy efficiency.

Opening Keynote speaker Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy ’09-’13, and Professor at Stanford University, starts the conference with the topic of 25297Materials Science Innovations in Energy Efficiency and Generation. Chu asserts that new materials enable newer technology, especially when coupled with better systems designed. Chu brings light to the issue of retaining intellectual property in America for future generations through our manufacturing choices, “We can not only invent things in America, it has to be made in America.”

25553In the field of High Efficiency Power Electronics, a panel of experts in the field gather to discuss future possibilities, and how we can enable and integrate new technologies into existing systems faster. Moderator Lisa Margonelli, Author and Journalist of New America Foundation, joins a diverse panel including; Rajeev Ram, Professor of Electrical Engineering at MIT, Hari Harikumar, VP of Advanced Technology at Ingersoll Rand, JB Straubel, Co-Founder and CTO of Tesla Motors, and Umesh Mishra, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at UC Santa Barbara and CEO of Transphorm.

Join the conversation @UCTelevision, @UCSBiee, #EnergyEfficiency

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