Category: Science

  • Drought in the West

    Climate scientist Julie Kalansky discusses how drought in California and Nevada is a common occurrence, with the attendant water restrictions and threat of severe wildfires bringing the reality of climate change into sharp focus. Future climate projections for the region suggest a trend toward more extremes, including more severe and prolonged drought as well as […]

  • Fire, Extreme Rainfall, and Debris Flows: Cascading Disasters in a Changing Climate

    As the climate warms across the globe, California is faced with adapting to a range of climate-related challenges – from drought and increased wildfire activity, to more extreme rain events. Many of these climate change phenomena work in concert to trigger catastrophic events such as post-wildfire debris flows like the one that devastated Montecito, California […]

  • Altered States

    In this new CARTA series, experts address altered states of the mind that are deliberately induced by humans – from the use of psychoactive compounds both natural and man-made, to self-induced states of consciousness and awareness, to anomalous states precipitated by different physical conditions and behaviors. Find out what is known about origins and mechanisms […]

  • A Deep Conversation with Rita Colwell

    For over a quarter century, Rita Colwell has led a research effort that provided a more complete understanding of how one of the oldest and most chronic scourges of humanity – cholera – proliferates and spreads. But her efforts did not come easily or without challenges. In this special presentation and open forum, she discusses […]

  • Getting Warmer? Ocean Temperatures off the California Coast 

    Local fishermen, surfers, and beachgoers know that ocean temperatures off California’s coast vary, often expectedly, and sometimes unexpectedly – you know, when the water is suddenly below sixty-degrees in the middle of an August heatwave! Join Scripps oceanographer and remote observation vehicle expert Katherine Zaba to learn how scientists deploy innovative ocean technology and just […]

  • A Closer Look at Alzheimer’s Disease

    The clinical and research perspectives on Alzheimer’s disease converge in the latest installment of “A Closer Look.” Douglas Galasko, MD shares the basics of Alzheimer’s including biomarkers of the disease, current treatment options, and what physicians know. Larry Goldstein, PhD explains how researchers are using stem cell technology to search for new drugs to treat […]

  • A Deep Look into COVID and a New World of Innovation

    Along with global health and economic devastation, the COVID-19 pandemic has forged an unprecedented path to research and education innovation. Bold scientific advances and cooperation led to a novel vaccine developed in record time, groundbreaking tools for detecting viruses and a pioneering vision for safely educating students. Gain an in-depth look at the trailblazing insights […]

  • The Art and Science of Atmospheric Rivers and the Changing Hydroclimate of the West

    California’s unique geography, with some of the continent’s highest mountains situated close to the broad expanse of the Pacific Ocean helps make California’s precipitation regime the most volatile in the country. This volatility, characterized by large natural swings between drought and extremely rainy years make water resource management in California notoriously difficult. Global climate change […]

  • Oxygen Loss in the Ocean: The Blinding Truth

    Ocean oxygen levels are changing globally as a result of both natural and human-influenced processes, and in some areas low oxygen events are becoming more common. While research on terrestrial animals has shown that low oxygen levels can affect vision – a vital function for finding food and shelter and avoiding predators – the impact […]

  • Exploring The Human-Ape Paradox

    CARTA’s Fall 2020 symposium, Comparative Anthropogeny: Exploring the Human Ape-Paradox, examines humans as a uniquely evolved, “biologically enculturated,” species as juxtaposed with our closest living relatives, the “great apes” (chimpanzees, bonobos, gorillas, and orangutans). By definition, each species is unique as it represents the outcome of independent evolution. Yet, humans appear to be a remarkable […]