Category: Science

  • Searching for a Cure for Blindness

    There are a number of diseases that can lead to blindness. But, a researcher at UC San Diego thinks there might be one way to cure them all. It’s called endogenous regeneration. Think of a lizard re-growing a lost tail. Zebrafish can do something similar with retinal tissue. Researcher Karl Wahlin says there is evidence […]

  • Building the Brain With Alysson Muotri

    Inside of each brain, there is the possibility to understand how trillions of neural connections come to sense the world, record memories, create an individual, and shape who you are and who you will become. Can we ever learn how this happens? By using cortical organoids – self organized clusters of neurons generated by stem […]

  • Engineering Mosquitos to Fight Malaria

    Mosquitos are the deadliest animal on Earth. They spread diseases like yellow fever, chikungunya, West Nile virus and malaria. Malaria alone killed 435,000 people and infected another 219 million in 2017 according to the World Health Organization. There are widespread efforts to combat mosquito-borne illnesses, including revolutionary new gene editing techniques. Ethan Bier and Valentino […]

  • Updating our Views on Nature and How to Save it

    What is nature? What does it mean to preserve, or save it? Science writer Emma Marris says one common definition of nature in North America is the way any given place was before European explorers arrived and began changing the landscape. Therefore, saving nature would mean returning the land to how it was before their […]

  • CARTA at 10

    More than 20 years ago, a small group of La Jolla academics began periodic meetings for transdisciplinary discussions on explaining the origin of humans – anthropogeny – an effort which has blossomed into an international intellectual collaborative organized by UC San Diego and the Salk Institute as the Center for Academic Research and Training in […]

  • Climate Change

    “When you talk about diversity of the soil, human beings we carry our soil with us. And we give that a very fancy term which is all the rage these days which is ‘microbiome.’ And as we see microbes diminishing in the soil, we are also seeing the same things happen in ourselves,” says Kelli […]

  • California Seaweed

    Kelp cutters once harvested tons of the nearshore kelp off the San Diego County coastline, producing additives for your ice cream, beer and pharmaceuticals. And of course, anyone who has had a California Roll or a bowl of miso soup is familiar with the centuries-old use of Nori. But now Scripps researchers are working to […]

  • Eavesdropping on Whales

    Since ancient seafarers first heard the strange calls of whales, humans have been fascinated by their meaning – from Flipper’s clicks and trills to the long serenades of Humpbacks. Inhabiting the dark ocean depths, whales use sound in many different ways – from feeding to navigating to finding friends and family. Join postdoctoral scholar Goldie […]

  • The CRISPR Revolution

    Jennifer Doudna is a leader in the CRISPR revolution. This new technology is a gene editing tool that manipulates DNA within organisms. The editing process has a wide variety of applications including correcting genetic defects, treating and preventing the spread of diseases and improving crops. Doudna, Professor of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology at UC […]

  • Lakes Beneath Antarctic Ice: Deep, Dark and Mysterious

    Where is one of the last places on earth you would expect to find a never-before known lake? Certainly, any of earth’s best-known deserts…the Sahara, Gobi, or Kalahari right? Technically fitting the definition of a desert by standards of precipitation, Antarctica could also be on that well-known list of dry places. But Antarctica has been […]