Dirty Sexy Policy

Dirty-Sexy-PolicyDirty Sexy Policy brings together prominent scholars, attorneys, activists, regulators, and journalists to explore current challenges facing media.

Participants and speakers engage in lively discussion and debate through a moderated Q&A to explore content regulation of obscenity and indecency, structural regulation of broadband technologies, and the broader stakes that citizens and policy critics share.

Tune in for each of these shows on UCTV from the Carsey-Wolf Center at UC Santa Barbara.

Media Policy and Fetishism
Des Freedman, Professor of Media and Communication at Goldsmiths, University of London, talks about the relationship between media and power together with the political and economic contexts of media policymaking and regulation.

Communications Evolution, Revolution, and the Role of the Academy
Nicholas Johnson was the FCC Commissioner from 1966-1973. He fought for reform by battling the status quo in the broadcasting industry. He takes us from those turbulent times to these. Many of the issues are similar but there are more and different players.

The Politics of Infrastructure
From net neutrality to what broadband means, the politics of the infrastructure we rely on to move information is evolving. A panel of experts discusses the idea that everything should be delivered equally and at the same speed regardless of who is sending it. Though much of the infrastructure is invisible, it has big impacts.

Obscenity and Indecency
How are obscenity and indecency officially defined and what does it mean for the current digital age? How are policies different for adult films and why is the first amendment applied differently?

Content and Conduits
How fast is our internet and how fast could or should it be? Explore the common ground between content and infrastructure policy. What role do the media giants play and how should they be regulated?

Watch more programs from the Carsey-Wolf Center.

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Arrr – Here be pirates!

8232“To err is human, to arr is pirate.”

This quote (a personal favorite) cleverly illustrates one of many myths Hollywood has popularized about pirates: that all pirates talked like… well, like pirates. You know, “shiver me timbers,” “blow me down” and the like. Other popular myths include:

- All pirates were missing body parts.
- All pirate ships flew the Skull and Crossbones.
- Pirates buried their stolen treasure.
- Pirates were fond of rum and parrots.
- Sailors became pirates to pursue a life of crime.

And perhaps most enduringly: All pirates were “anarchistic maniacs,” a la Blackbeard.

Here be Pirates chronicles the efforts of UC San Diego history professor Mark Hanna to correct these and other misconceptions about buccaneers. In his Harvard doctoral thesis, several popular courses and ongoing research, Hanna paints a detailed and nuanced picture of pirates and privateers, perhaps less colorful than the Tinseltown version but no less fascinating.

One especially intriguing aspect of Hanna’s work focuses on the profound contributions of those wide-ranging mariners to the development of the natural sciences from the late 16th century through the early 18th century. Occasional pirates such as William Dampier made extensive studies of Pacific Rim flora and fauna, and influenced later scientists such as Alexander von Humboldt and Charles Darwin. To spotlight the efforts of these “citizen scientists,” Hanna worked closely with the Special Collections & Archives at the UC San Diego Library to create Unlikely Naturalists, a local component of the traveling exhibition Real Pirates!, currently on display at the San Diego Natural History Museum. Unlikely Naturalists features original journals and logbooks held in the Library’s world-renowned Hill Collection of Pacific Voyages, which comprises more than 2,000 works spanning nearly 300 years of maritime exploration and discovery.

In addition to first-hand study of materials from the Hill Collection and a tour of the Museum exhibition, Hanna’s students sailed on the Californian, a 1984 replica of an 1847 cutter operated by the Maritime Museum of San Diego. During a four-hour trip students were introduced to sail operations and shipboard life, including the vital importance of teamwork and following the captain’s orders with dispatch.

As Hanna notes in Here Be Pirates, we can’t literally travel back in time, but these resources and activities – first-hand study of primary sources, the Museum exhibition, and sailing on a tall ship – each contribute to fostering empathy, which is vital to the study of the early modern period.

“Always be yourself. Unless you can be a pirate. Then always be a pirate.”

Watch Here be Pirates and browse other programs from the Library Channel.

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Contributed by Arts and Humanities Producer, John Menier

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Why are we violent?

786As CARTA co-director Ajit Varki so aptly put it in his concluding remarks, “It was an intellectually stimulating and fascinating but deeply disturbing symposium.”

From interactions in lions and our hominid cousins the chimpanzees, to our Pleistocene ancestors and early human cultures to modern society, CARTA gathered scientists across the spectrum from neurophysiology to sociology to bring their respective microscopes to bear upon the question of aggression within the human species, its role in our development, its causes and its consequences.

While the data are at times grim, disturbing and depressing, it is an important look at an inescapable (or is it?) feature of human evolution, the use of aggression and violence.

Hopefully, if one can remain dispassionate, we are led to ask, can it evolve out of us?

Watch the latest programs from CARTA on Male Aggression and Violence in Human Evolution to learn more.

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Let’s Talk About Movies

8181bNew programs in our Film & Television Collection will take you behind the scenes of the movie-making process.


Watch the latest from the Carsey-Wolf Center:

1761“Brave Miss World” Discussion
A look at the new documentary by Cecilia Peck, “Brave Miss World” that follows Miss Israel Linor Abargil from her rape, to her Miss World win and through to her crusade to fight for justice for victims of rape.


1761The Fault in Our Stars
“The Fault in Our Stars” director Josh Boone, and executive producer Isaac Klausner discuss their new film based on the New York Times best-selling novel written by John Green.


1761The 30th Anniversary of Footloose
Join writer/songrwriter Dean Pitchford to celebrate the classic film “Footloose.”


1761An Evening with Leonard Maltin
Leonard Maltin is one of the most recognized and respected film critics of our time. He recently completed his 30th season with the long-running television show, Entertainment Tonight (1981).


1761Draft Day – A Conversation with Ivan Reitman
Director Ivan Reitman and producers Tom Pollock and Joe Medjuck discuss their new film “Draft Day” starring Kevin Costner and Jennifer Garner.


Browse the entire collection of Carsey-Wolf programs, or visit our Film & Television Collection.

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Turbo Charge Your Job Hunt

28254Because he loves his job as an employment industry expert, few people think more about work than Phil Blair.

Beginning in 1977, he has built Manpower San Diego into the largest Manpower franchise in the U.S. It is San Diego’s fourth largest for-profit employer providing approximately 2,500 jobs daily.

Watch Job Won and learn strategies and techniques to leverage your education and experience into a career you’re passionate about.

For more career videos, check out The Career Channel.

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