Fourth Season of Script to Screen a Big Success

8232The UCSB Script to Screen series just completed its fourth and most successful season to date. We hosted three special Academy screenings (Whiplash, The Theory of Everything, and The Grand Budapest Hotel) where we connected Oscar nominees with students and the Santa Barbara Academy/Guild community. We also expanded our series to include a focus on television with our 10th Anniversary of Lost with Executive Producer/Director Jack Bender. This season our guests of honor shared key lessons about the importance of personally connecting to the material as well as having a family-esque support system to help bring the script to the screen.

Here are some special quotes from our guest artists:

29040The Theory of Everything with Oscar-nominated screenwriter Anthony McCarten:

“In 2004, that was the real catalyzing moment for me when I read Jane Hawking’s auto-biography. Everything I thought I knew about Stephen Hawking was displaced by everything I didn’t know. This was a unique, emotional insight into his private life. This incredible love story, very much one of a kind, unprecedented in some ways, challenging, heartbreaking, triumphant. I thought if I can get the rights to that book and marry it with the public world and what we know of Stephen and his public story, you know we would really have something special.”

29315Whiplash with Oscar-nominated writer/director Damien Chazelle:

“I was a drummer when I was in high school, and I had a teacher that was very much in this mold. It was the sort of thing where drumming had been this sort of hobby for myself that I did not take that seriously. As soon as I got in the orbit of this conductor/this teacher and his big band that he ran, he suddenly felt like life or death everyday. I felt the worse thing possible would be to screw up a hit or a beat. I just remember the daily dose of dread that I would feel during that time. I don’t play that much anymore, but you get a lot of fodder from that sort of emotional experience. It occurred to me that there might be a subject for a movie there.”

28922500 Days of Summer with screenwriter Scott Neustadter:

“This was very much a cathartic thing. I’d been broken up with, didn’t understand why, could not accept that it was just that she didn’t feel the same and then a minute later she got engaged, and I was like, What in the world? I was writing to put it all out there.”

The UCSB Script to Screen series returns in October 2015 for its 5th season. This coming year we will be expanding to include more actors on the stage with the screenwriter. Plus, we are currently planning a major event with a frontrunner to the 2016 Best Picture nominee and with a very special guest.

Browse all programs in the Script to Screen series.

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Science of Resilience: How to Thrive in Life

8232How do you thrive in life no matter where you are in life?

If you’re lucky to live long enough, you know that life has many pieces to it. It has the wonderful bits: falling in love, having a career, traveling, following your passion. And it often contains difficult times: illness, divorce, and loss. How you navigate through these different experiences determines how well you thrive in your life.

In this program from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging, Dr. Darlene Mininni shares how resilience, emotional intelligence and mindfulness can affect physical health. The motto that most inspires her comes from Job Kabat-Zinn: “You can’t stop the waves, but you can learn to surf.” In other words, good and bad events can occur in life. You might not be able to change the circumstances, but you can learn how to “surf” through them.

Dr. Mininni offers practical advice to bring more well-being into your life. Watch Science of Resilience: How to Thrive in Life.

Browse more programs from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging Series.

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Dealing with the Unexpected

8232Earthquakes, infectious diseases, tsunamis. Sometimes it feels like we are constantly being bombarded by news of disasters somewhere in the world. If you want to become more prepared and knowledgeable in dealing with unexpected events and their impact – while learning ways to heal the mind and body – checkout this series of programs.

Topics covered include earthquakes, calling 911, stress and psychiatric implications of trauma and disasters, and an update on local San Francisco response teams. Also covered are other timely issues including nuclear, biological and chemical disasters as well as the next big outbreak.

There is no time like the present to get prepared for the next disaster even while hoping it does not affect us.

Watch Disaster Preparedness: The Impact of Dealing with the Unexpected.

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Atmospheric Rivers: California Rainmakers

8232“If we went straight up from here to space, took every water vapor molecule, and condensed it into liquid, anybody hazard to guess how deep it might be?”

So queried Marty Ralph, atmospheric scientist and director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes early on in his fascinating exploration of the newest understanding of how precipitable moisture is transported in the atmosphere. The answer to his question is as surprising as what people like him have helped us come to understand about what scientists and meteorologists now call “ARs”, or atmospheric rivers.

Just ten years ago we didn’t have a clear understanding or a name for this phenomenon, but as Marty shows, the advent of new satellite technology made these atmospheric features “…stand out like a sore thumb.”

If the history of their discovery isn’t fascinating enough, what they mean for California, and anywhere else in the world affected by the influence of ARs is stunning in terms of what they can do in terms of damage, as well as ending droughts. Considering the current situation you might find yourself hoping for a bit of an “Arkstorm”. What’s that? You’ll have to watch and see, but I will say, like massive earthquakes, they have happened here before, and they will happen again.

Watch Atmospheric Rivers: California Rainmakers.

Browse more programs in Perspectives on Ocean Science.

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Myrlie Evers-Williams and the Journey to Equality

8232Myrlie Evers-Williams became a prominent social justice activist after the murder of her husband, civil rights activist Medger Evers. For more than five decades, she has continued to carry on his legacy, never relenting in her determination to change the face of race relations in this country. To many, she has become a symbol of courage and perseverance.

She reflects here on the impact of the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, and calls on today’s Americans to continue her quest to quash racism and bring equality for all.

Ruminating on her long journey, in a soft voice, Evers-Williams said to herself, “you are not through yet.” And with her voice getting stronger, she said to the audience, “And I say to all of you, you are not through either… as long as America has the challenge of prejudice and racism in this country that is supposed to be a place free for all of us, to do and be the best that we can do, we have a challenge.”

This heartfelt talk was presented by Thurgood Marshall College, the Helen Edison Lecture Series and the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at UC San Diego.

Watch Tomorrow’s Leaders: Building on the Legacy of Selma with Myrlie Evers-Williams.

Browse more programs from the Helen Edison Lecture Series.

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