Category Archives: UCTV

Join us on Science Field Trips to Lawrence Livermore National Lab!

8232Join a group of science teachers and middle and high school students on a field trip to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the annual Science on Saturday (SOS) lecture series. Presented by leading LLNL researchers and supported by master high school science teachers, each topic highlights cutting-edge science occurring at the lab.

Check out this year’s field trips:

82323D Printing: From Imagination to Realization
Revolutionary changes to materials and structures are now possible with 3D printing, bringing concepts that were previously only imagined into reality. This breakthrough technology fabricates components by adding material layer by layer from the bottom up allowing for the creation of highly complex and previously unrealizable structures.

8232Reconstructing a Rabies Epidemic: Byte by Byte
A vast majority of the newly discovered human pathogens are viruses that have jumped to humans from an animal host (“cross-species transmission”). Find out how biologists and computer scientists have collaborated and used cutting edge ultra-deep sequencing technology to study the dynamics of a 2009 rabies outbreak to better understand emergent viruses, such as Ebola and Zika.

8232Forensic Science in Crisis: How Proteins Can Help
In the last decade, the scientific foundations of a number of traditional forensic methods have come under increasing criticism by the scientific community, leading to their discontinuation or reduced effectiveness in criminal prosecutions. These challenges raise questions about the admissibility of certain type of evidence in current cases and the validity of previous convictions. We will discuss the basis of these issues and describe some of the work ongoing at LLNL to try and address some of them. In particular we will describe an entirely new science-based approach to human identification.

Browse Field Trip at the Lab: Science on Saturday to discover more from past field trips!

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Food Justice: Economics, Ethics, Access

8232What a group! You know you’re watching something special when Dolores Huerta, the legendary co-founder of the United Farm Workers and Rose Hayden-Smith, the PhD author who writes the UC Food Observer blog are flanked by passionate leaders in healthcare, social justice, and organic farming – all talking about the policies and politics that lead to food deserts and swamps in some communities and abundance in others. Gathered in the historic Star Theatre in Oceanside, California, this lively panel led by Michelle Lerach of the Berry Good Food Foundation will inspire many to plant their own gardens, share their green bounty and engage on issues that address the most fundamental human need – healthy food for a thriving planet.

Watch Food Justice: Economics, Ethics, Access

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Two New Programs on the UC Wellbeing Channel

8232The UC Wellbeing Channel is the place to discover what top medical and scientific experts believe will lead to a mindful, balanced and healthy life. Whether it’s understanding the risks of eating genetically modified foods, as explained by Dave Schubert of the Salk Institute on Biological Studies (and backed up by peer-reviewed journal articles) or, upon getting a cancer diagnosis, embracing a comprehensive treatment plan like those offered by Daniel Vicario, MD, of the San Diego Cancer Research Institute, the UC Wellbeing Channel introduces you to respected academics who integrate traditional healing techniques with the best practices of Western medicine.

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The Politics of Food – Food Choice, Food Production and the Food Movement

8232Behind every bite of food, there is a policy that influenced its production.

Marion Nestle, NYU Professor and prize-winning author, finds a paradox in today’s global food system in that food insecurity or obesity threaten the health and welfare of half the world’s population yet there is an overabundant and overly competitive food system that is motivated by corporate growth targets. The profits are in “junk food,” so the economic forces operate against healthy eating.

This contradiction between the goals of public health and food corporations has led to a large and growing food movement in the United States which encourages us to vote with our forks and support the food system we want when we shop.

Find out more about the economic and institutional factors that influence food policies and choices, and think about how we should balance individual and societal responsibility for those choices. Then, get some tips on how you can make a difference when you shop for food.

Nestle is the author of numerous books, including “Food Politics,” which explored the way corporations influence our nutritional choices, and “What to Eat,” a survey of how to navigate the modern American supermarket.

Watch:
Food Politics and the Twenty-First Century Food Movement with Marion Nestle

Food and Politics with Marion Nestle – Conversations with History

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Unlocking the Science Behind Atmospheric Rivers

8232 This year, California’s winter weather has been wet and wild. Join Scripps scientist Marty Ralph, Director of the Center for Western Weather and Water Extremes (CW3E) as he describes the phenomena of atmospheric rivers, their impact on our weather, and the essential role modeling and prediction play in managing California’s precious water resources.

Watch Unlocking the Science Behind Atmospheric Rivers

To see more programs in the Jeffrey B. Graham Perspectives on Ocean Science Lecture Series, click here.

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