Disruptive Cinema

“Subversive” is defined as “seeking or intended to subvert an established system or institution; disruptive; inflammatory.” Films may be considered aesthetically or culturally subversive, or both. Subversive cinema has been with us since the silent era; early examples include Griffith’s The Birth of a Nation (though it wasn’t considered subversive at the time), Robert Wiene’s The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Benjamin Christensen’s Haxan: Witchcraft Through the Ages, and Luis Buñuel’s notorious L’Age d’Or, one of the first films to be widely banned (and still banned today in several countries).

Many films deemed as disruptive go on to achieve cult status and garner a fervent following. The topic of subversive or transgressive cinema has also received serious consideration by scholars, most notably in Amos Vogel’s seminal study “Film as a Subversive Art,” which catalogues over 600 films that fit the definition, and the more recent “Cult Films” by UC San Diego Professor Allan Havis.

Just in time to present an alternative option for streaming, UC Santa Barbara’s Carsey-Wolf Center (CWC) is presenting its “Subversives” discussion series, featuring five films spanning 70 years and three countries. The slate ranges from Chaplin’s much-maligned The Great Dictator to Parasite, the 2019 winner of the Best Picture Academy Award. The series begins with Sorry to Bother You, a provocative satire of American capitalism and white corporate culture, and also includes television’s groundbreaking Pee-Wee’s Playhouse. By including Pee-Wee Herman’s show, series curator and host Miguel Penabella, a PhD candidate in Film & Media Studies at UCSB, explains that he “wanted to imagine a broader, expansive idea of ‘Subversives’ as well, including films that may be aesthetically or commercially subversive or works that may have generated a cult following,” noting that the Playhouse fits the bill.

Post-screening discussions include conversations with filmmakers, critics, and film scholars, followed by lively Q&A sessions. Films examined include:

Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You (2018)
Bong Joon Ho’s Parasite (2019)
Charlie Chaplin’s The Great Dictator (1942)
Pee-Wee Herman’s Pee-Wee’s Playhouse (1986-1990)
Jeff Barnaby’s Blood Quantum (2019)

Browse all programs in Subversives.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Oxygen Loss in the Ocean: The Blinding Truth

Ocean oxygen levels are changing globally as a result of both natural and human-influenced processes, and in some areas low oxygen events are becoming more common. While research on terrestrial animals has shown that low oxygen levels can affect vision – a vital function for finding food and shelter and avoiding predators – the impact of low oxygen on marine life is much less well understood.

Join Scripps postdoctoral scholar Lillian McCormick for an in depth look at how and why oxygen is changing in the ocean and how her research is providing insight into the impacts of low oxygen on vision in marine invertebrates. Learn about her stunning new research results, her plans for future investigations and what we can do about oxygen decline in the ocean.

Watch Biological Impacts of Oxygen Loss in the Ocean: The Blinding Truth.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Social Inequities and Suffering Caused by COVID-19

While a Sars CoV-2 vaccine is here providing hope for the year ahead, the pain and devastation caused by the pandemic will persist as new infections currently continue to expand at an ever-increasing rate.

Amidst all this, UC San Diego has established itself as a recognized leader in proactively responding to this disaster. Hear from UC San Diego’s front-line health and medical experts as they discuss disparities in the clinical impact and outcomes of COVID-19, their first-hand experiences and lessons learned in dealing with the disease.

Also, as the economy continues to suffer from the pandemic, hear about scalable and practical solutions for returning to work in a safe environment.

Watch A Deep Look Into: Social Inequities and Suffering Caused by COVID-19 – Reports from the Front Lines.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

Challenges Facing the Free World, with H.R. McMaster

The United States suffers from a “strategic narcissism” that leads to international missteps and catastrophes, retired Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster said in a recent conversation with journalist Lowell Bergman.

In a wide-ranging conversation, the Army combat veteran and historian discussed topics ranging from the Iran Nuclear deal, the war in Afghanistan, the Syria conflict and US-China relations.

McMaster served for 13 months as National Security Advisor under President Donald Trump. He declined to discuss details of what that was like. He is now a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution.

McMaster expressed confidence in the nation’s democratic institutions despite the tests this year: the pandemic, the recession, racial and social divisions and extremely partisan presidential election.

Watch General H. R. McMaster in Conversation with Lowell Bergman.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus

WHAT’S NEXT: COVID-19

The number of people infected by the coronavirus continues to grow every day as does the number of deaths. We have learned a great deal about the virus, treatments and ways to slow the spread since the outbreak began.

UCSF doctors and scientists have been on the front lines of treatment and research since the beginning. This series takes you inside their work to learn what we know now about the pandemic, what lies ahead, and the implications of lessons learned on future medical treatments.

Direct from those who live and breathe it every day, find out what’s next in the science and care of COVID-19.

Browse more programs in What’s Next: COVID-19, Science, and the Public Health.

facebooktwittergoogle_plus